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Kurt Busch’s No. 41 becomes first car revealed for this year’s throwback race at Darlington Raceway

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If Kurt Busch’s car in this year’s Bojangles’ Southern 500 throwback race at Darlington Raceway looks familiar, there’s a good reason for it.

Busch will drive a car with a paint scheme similar to the car he drove at the 1.366-mile egg-shaped track in the 2003 Carolina Dodge Dealers 400.

And what a race that was. Busch’s No. 97 Rubbermaid-sponsored red and gray Ford had a last-lap fender-banging battle with Ricky Craven’s No. 32 Cal Wells Racing Pontiac, which ended up 0.002 seconds ahead of Busch for the win.

Ironically, tomorrow, March 16, marks the 15th anniversary of what at the time was the closest finish in NASCAR history.

Busch’s Darlington black, red and gray throwback scheme – the first of all teams to be revealed for this year’s race – on his No. 41 Haas Automation Ford Fusion, was first unveiled by NASCAR.com.

Busch has never won at Darlington. His 2003 runner-up finish has been his highest finish, though he’s also finished third in 2010 and in last year’s race.

This will be the fourth consecutive year for Darlington’s popular throwback weekend. This year’s theme is “seven decades of NASCAR” across the entire weekend from Aug. 31 to Sept. 2.

Stewart-Haas Racing has won the best throwback paint scheme the last two years (in voting at NASCAR.com), last year with Danica Patrick’s No. 10 car (a blue-and-white look that honored NASCAR Hall of Famer Robert Yates), and Tony Stewart’s car for his final race at Darlington in 2016 that honored Bobby Allison.

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Darlington Raceway continues trend of enhancing fan experience at track

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Construction on new seats at Darlington Raceway will begin Thursday and be completed in time for the Sept. 2 Southern 500, the track announced Wednesday.

The Associated Press reported that the cost of the project will be nearly $7 million.

Darlington Raceway, which hosted its first Cup race in 1950, will remove the metal seats in the Tyler Tower along the frontstretch and replace it with stadium-style seats that include cup holders. The previous seats were 18 inches wide. The new seats are to be 20-22 inches wide.

Also, the seating will be removed from the Wallace Grandstand along the frontstretch. Bench-style bleachers will be added and those seats will be 20-22 inches wide. The seats from the Colvin Grandstand along the backstretch will be removed and will be replaced by bleachers that have wider seats.

Other improvements include additional handrails, guardrails, refurbished restrooms and concessions stands and a wall of honor along the frontstretch and backstretch. The names of race winners will be placed on the walls in those areas a la a team’s ring of honor in a stadium.

Also, all grandstands at Darlington Raceway will be considered smoke-free.

The move to wider seats will provide additional fan comfort and continues a trend in the sport of fan enhancements. Speedway Motorsports Inc. recently announced changes to its tracks, including new club seating at what is being called the Restart Bar Zone Club at Texas Motor Speedway and Atlanta Motor Speedway’s Restart Bar. Both will be situated 20 or more rows above the restart zone. Las Vegas Motor Speedway is adding three renovated clubhouse areas, two separate loge-box seat offerings and a racing-inspired sports lounge.


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Reliving some of NASCAR’s most dramatic finishes

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The Minnesota Vikings’ win against the New Orleans Saints on Sunday marked the first time in NFL history that a playoff game ended with a game-winning touchdown with no time left on the clock.

NASCAR has had its share of dramatic finishes through the years. While it’s easy to debate which dramatic finishes rank among the all-time best, here’s a look at some of the most dramatic (and surprising) wins in NASCAR.

The first selection comes from what is now the Xfinity Series. It was the 2012 season-opening race at Daytona International Speedway. Kurt Busch led with Kyle Busch pushing him as they entered Turn 3. Behind them were Joey Logano, Trevor Bayne, Tony Stewart, Elliott SadlerRicky Stenhouse Jr., Kasey Kahne, Cole Whitt and Brad Keselowski.

None of them won the race. 

James Buescher, who was 11th in Turn 4 won for his only Xfinity victory in 91 career starts. 


Carl Edwards had won the Xfinity race the day at Atlanta but had yet to win in 16 previous Cup starts before he cranked the engine at Atlanta Motor Speedway in March 2005. Edwards came from behind to beat Jimmie Johnson at the line in among the closest finishes in NASCAR.


Dale Earnhardt’s incredible ride from 18th to first in the final five laps in 2000 at Talladega Superspeedway is memorable for that alone but it also was his 76th and final Cup victory. When the video clip below starts, you don’t even see Earnhardt but he’s there lurking and works his way up the field. With two laps left, announcer Jerry Punch exclaims: “The Intimidator is scraped and beaten on the right side, but he will not be denied! “Mr. Restrictor Plate knows there are two laps to go! Earnhardt drives to the high side of Bobby Labonte. Wow.”


As they took the white flag at Watkins Glen International in 2012, Kyle Busch led, Brad Keselowski was second and Marcos Ambrose was third.

What followed was a chaotic final lap that ended with Ambrose winning. It led broadcaster Dale Jarrett to say about the beating, banging and battling: “A year’s worth of excitement in 2.45 miles. Incredible.”


Ricky Craven tried to make his move by Kurt Busch with two laps to go at Darlington Raceway in 2003 but slid up and made contact with Busch and lost his momentum. That allowed Busch to dive underneath and take the lead back. Craven persisted. As they came off the final corner, Craven went underneath Busch for a door-slamming drag race to the checkered flag, nipping Busch by 0.002 seconds to win.

Of course, one can’t include such a list without one of the sport’s most famous finishes. Donnie Allison led Cale Yarborough on the last lap of the 1979 Daytona 500. Yarborough dived low on the backstretch to pass Allison, who blocked. They hit, bounced off each other and hit again before crashing in Turn 3. Richard Petty drove by several seconds later to take the lead and go on to win the event. As Petty celebrated, Allison, Yarborough and Bobby Allison, who had stopped to check on his brother, fought.


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Darlington celebrates NASCAR’s 70th birthday by revealing 4th throwback weekend details

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Darlington Raceway on Thursday celebrated the 70th birthday of NASCAR in a big way, announcing details for the fourth annual NASCAR throwback weekend.

The track revealed the 2018 edition of the throwback weekend will celebrate “Seven Decades of NASCAR,” to be held Aug. 31-Sept. 2 at the legendary 1.366-mile track.

The weekend will include the Cup Series’ Bojangles’ Southern 500 and the Xfinity Series’ Sports Clips Haircuts VFW 200.

NASCAR held its first of several organizational meetings on Dec. 14, 1947, at the Streamline Hotel in Daytona Beach, Florida. That ultimately led to the official formation of NASCAR on Feb. 21, 1948.

The throwback weekend will honor and feature highlights of some of the biggest moments in the sport’s history over its first 70 years.

“This is a tremendous opportunity for Darlington Raceway and the NASCAR industry to celebrate the sport over a seven decade period during our 2018 throwback weekend,” Darlington Raceway President Kerry Tharp said in a media release.

“We have been era specific the past three years,” Tharp added, “so we felt it was important to recognize the 70th anniversary of NASCAR with our ‘Seven Decades of NASCAR’ celebration next season and give the teams, sanctioning body and others a wider brush to paint a picture capturing memorable moments we might not have celebrated in year’s past.”

Memorable moments to be celebrated include several that took place at Darlington itself, including Ned Jarrett’s record-setting 14-lap victory in the 1965 Southern 500, Ricky Craven’s record-setting photo finish win over Kurt Busch in 2003, and Jimmie Johnson’s 2012 Southern 500 win, which gave team owner Rick Hendrick his 200th career victory, among others.

Cup winners of the first three throwback weekends have been Carl Edwards (2015), Martin Truex Jr. (2016) and Denny Hamlin (2017).

As has been the case for the first three throwback weekends, the track will once again issue commemorative tickets for the Southern 500.

“We have produced commemorative tickets for our fans every year of the throwback program, which is an important part of our platform,” Tharp said. “We appreciate how much the fans have supported Darlington Raceway and want them to walk away from our weekend with a special keepsake that recognizes our rich history and honors the stars of our sport.”

NASCAR America: Danica Patrick reflects back on her racing career (video)

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Danica Patrick was the special guest in an hour-long appearance on Wednesday’s NASCAR America at the NASCAR Hall of Fame.

In one of the segments, Steve Letarte and Jeff Burton spoke with Patrick about her overall racing career, starting with go-karts at a young age, racing in Europe in her teens, her IndyCar years and of course her NASCAR career to date.

Here’s some excerpts of that segment and Patrick’s observations (watch the whole segment in the video above):

Making the transition from IndyCar to NASCAR: “It was a transition, that’s why I did Nationwide and two part-time years. I started slow and really enjoyed then made the full-time transition in the Nationwide Series in 2012 and then Cup in 2013.”

Big change from IndyCar to driving a NASCAR car: “Just driving it is fine.  If you can drive, you can drive.”

What really got her career going: “In the Formula Ford Festival (in England), there were over 100 entries, this is the series Jenson Button drove in. I finished second, which is the highest for an American and a female. I think it really got the attention of Bobby Rahal, who gave me a job when I came back to the U.S. a couple years later.”

The track she wanted to win the most at, either in IndyCar or NASCAR: “I always felt I would win at Indy. When I came to NASCAR, maybe it was because I didn’t clarify which car I would win in. I wouldn’t change anything. … I don’t ever look back at things and wish it was different. I believe everything happens for a reason.

Do she have any unfinished business? “Do I have unfinished business? I guess if you don’t accomplish your goal, there’s always some level of unfinished business no matter of who you are or what you do.”

What are her favorite and least favorite tracks: “Indy is special. Always has been, always will be. There’s an aura about it and I feel I know every inch about that place. If I had to pick a Cup track, I’d say it was Martinsville. Honestly, I hate Darlington. I just hate it. It is an exhausting race. It is four corners, next to the wall every corner, driving over the apron. It’s a tough track. I have not liked Darlington.”

Watch the full interview with Patrick in the video above.