Dale Jarrett

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Bump & Run: Is NASCAR returning to the Wild West in terms of justice?

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Conflict on and off the track has gained attention the past two weekends in the sport and how NASCAR responds will help set the tone for the garage the rest of the season.

Dale Jarrett and Kyle Petty, who will be on NASCAR America from 5:30 – 7 p.m. ET today on NBCSN, join Nate Ryan and Dustin Long in discussing that subject and more in this week’s Bump & Run.

In the last two weeks, NASCAR did not penalize Kyle Busch and Joey Logano for an altercation on pit road, and a series official suggested this week that there might not be any additional penalties to Austin Dillon (who was parked by NASCAR) for slowly cutting across Cole Custer’s car and making contact after an incident between them in the Xfinity race. What do you make of NASCAR’s reaction to these incidents and the message it sends to the garage?

Kyle Petty: First, I will never condone the use of a race car or physical force in settling a perceived injustice. Having said that … I think NASCAR is in a little bit of a box they’ve put themselves in. We can go back to “boys have at it.’’ The stage races are just another level of that. Stage racing was designed to make every lap mean more, for drivers to race “harder” and to bring the intensity level and anticipation of the event to another level.

If that’s what you’re looking for, you can’t penalize the drivers when they react the way they do to the position the rules put them in. We’ve begged for emotion and personality from drivers, and when they give it to us there’s an outcry to penalize them. We can’t have it both ways, and the middle ground is confusing to fans and drivers alike. I guess it’s like that old saying “be careful what you wish for’’ because when you have it you don’t know what to do with it.

Dale Jarrett: I like the idea that nothing was done as far as the Kyle Busch and Joey Logano incident. This business is difficult, especially in a situation where something happened on the last lap of the race. It’s hard to expect a driver not to react in some way, shape or form. I’d rather Kyle Busch have a conversation and then if he felt it needed to go further … but he felt like he needed to talk in a different manner. I’m not opposed to that. I think you need to protect your ground and show your displeasure.

I’m not a fan even though I’ve been there and pretty much every driver has been there as far as a retaliation on the race track with the race car. I think we need to be discouraging that way more than we need to be discouraging drivers having conversations. We don’t need fights every weekend by any stretch of the imagination, but if they want to have discussions and something breaks out from there, I’m much more in favor of that than using the race cars.

Nate Ryan: The Busch-Logano reaction doesn’t surprise me. No harm was done (aside from the lone aggressor’s forehead), and I think it’s understood where the line is on drivers settling it between themselves. They have great latitude to approach each other after races, and as long as it doesn’t result in a broken jaw, there won’t be severe consequences for heated altercations between drivers (and subsequently their team members).

 The Custer-Dillon situation was slightly more surprising as NASCAR officials don’t want drivers employing their cars as weapons of revenge, particularly under caution. But some punishment was meted out in parking Dillon for the race and summoning him for a meeting. That officials will meet with Custer and Dillon together in Southern California this weekend also negates the need for further action. 

I think the message being sent is that NASCAR proactively is ensuring feuds don’t escalate to being uncontrollable but also is being careful to avoid the perception of micromanaging emotions.

Dustin Long: The days of NASCAR overseeing the drivers with the strictness of a convent school are over. That doesn’t mean that they’ll allow a driver to wreck another — as Matt Kenseth did to Joey Logano in 2015 — but for a sport that has an edgy sponsor and looks to gain the attention of more fans, slapping wrists with a ruler are long gone. The question is how far will officials go? When they react? Will it be an overreaction to get the garage back in line?

In the last seven races, dating back to last season, there have been seven different winners: Ryan Newman, Martin Truex Jr., Brad Keselowski, Kurt Busch, Jimmie Johnson, Joey Logano and Carl Edwards. Does the streak of different winners continue this weekend at Auto Club Speedway and who might be that driver?

Kyle Petty: Yes. I believe the streak continues! Larson, Elliott, Harvick. The list of drivers who have been strong so far this year is diverse. Not the usual suspects! We know Michigan was Larson’s first win and California is a sister track. Chase will contend again and has been in position to win every race this season. Harvick is Harvick, any race, any time, anywhere he can win. I will say all I know for sure is Carl Edwards won’t win!

Dale Jarrett: Yes. I think the name that probably comes to mine and everybody else’s is Kyle Larson. He was in position to win every race we’ve had so far this year. Especially with that race track, he’s done well there and it’s his type of race track. I think these new rules with less amount of downforce are really only enhancing his driving abilities. I think he will have to outrun Chase Elliott to get the checkered flag.

Nate Ryan: Yes. Kyle Busch has this place sorted (three wins, including two of the past four races), and he drives well when motivated. Though “Everything Is Great,” it won’t diminish Busch’s drive to return to victory lane and take some smug satisfaction at reclaiming the spotlight for the right reason.

(P.S. I also reserve the right to change my mind for Sunday’s pre-race Staff Picks post on nbcsports.com/nascar.)

Dustin Long: Yes. After the millennials have finished second each of the first four races (Ryan Blaney at Daytona and Kyle Larson each of the past three weeks), one of them is due to win. That includes Chase Elliott, who has two top-five finishes this season.

Watch Dale Jarrett and Kyle Petty on NASCAR America today from 5:30 – 7 p.m. ET on NBCSN.

NASCAR America: Dale Jarrett on restrictor plates at Indy — ‘An awful idea’

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NASCAR Hall of Famer Dale Jarrett makes no bones about his feelings that NASCAR is expected to use restrictor plates in July’s Xfinity Series race at Indianapolis Motor Speedway.

“It’s an awful idea, in my opinion,” Jarrett said on Monday’s edition of NASCAR America.

Jarrett knows what he’s talking about. He’s a two-time winner (1996, 1999) of the Brickyard 400 at Indy and a seven time top-10 finisher at the 2.5-mile IMS in 13 career Cup starts.

MORE: NASCAR will use restrictor plates at Indy, could Michigan and Pocono be on the horizon?

However, if NASCAR likes how plates work in the Xfinity race at Indy, don’t be surprised if NASCAR also uses them in the Cup race there in 2018.

Again, Jarrett disagrees.

“Taking horsepower away, that’s the one thing a driver can utilize to make passes at a racetrack that is so flat,” Jarrett said. “We tried restrictor plates one time at New Hampshire. Jeff Burton led every single lap of that race and went on to win.

“It was a terrible race except for Jeff Burton. He was the only one that thought it was good that day.”

Jarrett is definitely a proponent of keeping cars plate-free at Indy.

“Taking power away, I think is a bad idea,” he said. “There are other options, I think. Open the aerodynamic rules some, that’s where you’re going to get more passing involved. But let them have the horsepower trying to do it.

“I just don’t like this idea, as you can tell.”

Bump & Run: Judging the crop of young Cup drivers

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NASCAR’s youth movement continues to make an impact in the Cup series. As the sport’s younger drivers race toward a victory, seven-time champion Jimmie Johnson has gotten off to a slow start. 

Dale Jarrett and Kyle Petty, who both will be on NASCAR America from 5:30 – 6:30 p.m. ET today on NBCSN, join Nate Ryan and Dustin Long in discussing those subjects in this week’s Bump & Run.

Which young driver has been more impressive to you so far this season: Kyle Larson, Chase Elliott or Ryan Blaney?

Kyle Petty: That’s a tough question. I’m going to have to answer it’s a tie: Chase and Ryan. Here’s why: I think Chase gets better every week. Every week. I don’t think Chase is far away from not only his first win but his second or third win. I think Ryan has come out stronger and smarter than he was last year. There’s something different about him. The things he does on a racetrack. In these first three races, he’s not put himself in a bad position. Go back to last year. There were a few times he had fast cars but he would end up against the wall, something would happen. He put himself in a bad position. He’s seems to have outgrown that in the first part of this year.

Dale Jarrett: I’m going to say that Kyle Larson has been the most impressive to this point. I think I’ve had reservations, like other people. We know he is very talented, but could the team keep up with his progress? They’ve shown me that they’ve done that and that he’s figured out to run these 400- and 500-mile races. He’s been outstanding.

Nate Ryan: Tough question, so I’ll go solely off the results. With an average finish of 5.3 (including two runner-up finishes), Larson has been the best statistically, and though Atlanta highlighted the fact he still is learning how to close races, he is maximizing the potential of his Chip Ganassi Racing Chevrolet. It took the team the first three months of the 2016 season to provide Larson with rides worthy of his ability. The No. 42 is well ahead of that pace this season, which should bode well for Larson. Chase Elliott barely trails Larson in performance and also has been in position to win every race. It’s only a matter of time until his breakthrough occurs.

Dustin Long: I like what I’m seeing from Kyle Larson and his team so far this season. He still needs to pull out the win at the end, but he’s showing the signs that he’s getting closer to doing that more often. No other driver in the series has run as much in the top 15 in races this year (95.3 percent of all laps). He’s putting together more complete races.

For the first time in his career, Jimmie Johnson has failed to score a top-10 finish in any of the first three races of the season. Should there be concern about this?

Kyle Petty: Yes. I think he needs to call Carl Edwards and retire. No, there’s no concern. No. No, no there is no concern. Jimmie has been so good for so long and so consistent. It just happens sometimes. I do believe that maybe as you look at this and the rise of the Toyotas and now throw (Martin) Truex and Erik (Jones) in, the way the Fords are running the first part of this year. Theoretically, now there’s another four of five cars Jimmie has to outrun on a regular basis, which is a little bit tougher. Until Jimmie absolutely falls off the face of the earth, that’s when you should be concerned. They’re not where they want to be, but they get that way sometimes and they find their way back.

Dale Jarrett: I think there should be some concern there. I think the Hendrick organization, in my mind, is still behind, except for Chase Elliott. They seem to have things figured out. I think Jimmie and Chad Knaus have some work to do. As we’ve seen, they’re pretty good at figuring things out.

Nate Ryan: Some, though slow cars aren’t what have prevented Johnson from recording a top 10. If his pit speeding lights were calibrated better at Atlanta (and if a scoring break had gone his way), he had the speed to contend. Las Vegas went awry when a late-race strategy failed to pan out perfectly, but if his pit crew correctly fastens lug nuts on the final stop, Johnson easily gets a top 10. It’s mostly just a case of improving on execution – which is an unusual weakness for the buttoned-up No. 48 Chevrolet team.

Dustin Long: Considering this team struggled during the middle of last season and still won the championship, I’m not overly concerned at this point. It just shows how one little thing that can make a big impact in a team’s finish (i.e. speeding at Atlanta and loose lug nuts at Las Vegas). Now, if this team continues to show similar flaws in a few months, then it will be more of a concern.

Watch Dale Jarrett and Kyle Petty on NASCAR America today from 5:30 – 6:30 p.m. ET on NBCSN.

NASCAR America: Joe Gibbs reacts to Hall of Fame nomination

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On Wednesday, Joe Gibbs announced as one of the five newest nominees for the NASCAR Hall of Fame. Following the inductions of Rick Hendrick and Richard Childress earlier this year, Gibbs joined fellow owner Roger Penske in being nominated.

Gibbs called into NASCAR America to discuss his nomination and shared stories with Dale Jarrett, who was the first driver for Joe Gibbs Racing after it was founded in 1992. Jarrett scored JGR’s first NASCAR win in the 1993 Daytona 500. Gibbs has since won four Cup championships.

Bump & Run: Reviewing Daytona, looking ahead to Atlanta

Photo by Brian Lawdermilk/Getty Images
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One down, 35 to go in the Cup Series.

As the series moves from Daytona and to Atlanta, here’s a chance to look back and look ahead.

Dale Jarrett, who will be on NASCAR America, which airs from 5:30 to 6: p.m. ET today on NBCSN, joins Nate Ryan, Jerry Bonkowski and Dustin Long in answering this week’s Bump & Run questions.

— What were your takeaways from Speedweeks at Daytona?

Dale Jarrett: Two things. The aggressive driving that we saw throughout the entire Speedweeks and a lot of that was from the younger drivers. I think it was one of the most aggressive Speedweeks on the race track that I’ve seen in quite a while, which made for very compelling races from the Clash to the Daytona 500.

Also, we talk about perseverance a lot, how you really have to have a thick skin to make it through this business, and I think Kurt Busch is a perfect example of that, how he’d come close so many times in those other 63 starts in restrictor-plate races and finally things went his way at the end of the race.

Nate Ryan: Manufacturer influence in NASCAR’s premier series is as strong as it’s seemed in decades.

Obviously, many took a cue from the way that Toyota controlled the tempo in winning last year’s Daytona 500, and Ford in particular tried to mimic that (and mostly was successful through the strange bedfellows of Stewart-Haas Racing’s Kevin Harvick and the Team Penske cars of Joey Logano and Brad Keselowski).

But the automaker narrative transcends the Daytona draft. There were rumblings of another switch being in the offing, or perhaps the arrival of a new manufacturer that could build around an established team.

While teams are fighting tooth and nail to attract the corporate sponsorship that once seemed plentiful, it seems as if manufacturers have become among the most stable of revenue streams and engineering/technical support for teams. It isn’t the factory-driven competition and funding model of the 1960s, but the landscape slowly is creeping in that direction.

Jerry Bonkowski: Kurt Busch’s determination was one of the best stories of the day. After previously finishing runner-up three times in the Daytona 500, Busch overcame race damage and a dangerously low fuel level with a not-to-be-denied attitude that will go down as one of the most memorable and inspiring rallies in recent Great American Race history.

Dustin Long: With a first-time Daytona 500 winner and last-lap maneuvers throughout Speedweeks, I found it interesting that some among the fan base seemed to be hung up on the five-minute clock. Yes, there were numerous accidents, so this was an issue discussed, but to me this has the feel of talking about how pass interference was called in the Super Bowl instead of the game itself. The rule was put in to help cut costs for teams and for safety. Drivers don’t need to be racing in cars that have had significant damage and risk getting into another incident or causing an accident. End of story. Move on to something else.

— What will you be keeping a close eye on this weekend at Atlanta?

Dale Jarrett: I wasn’t sure how the stages were going to affect Daytona but it was very evident to how they did, as the Toyotas, Fords and Chevrolets took on their different strategies. I’m more interested with Atlanta being a race track that is hard on tires and very difficult to get a grip on, how that is going to play out and with not a lot of downforce in comparison to what they had a couple of years ago – just how hard these cars are going to be driven at this track and who is going to have the best answer for it.

Nate Ryan: Two things:

  1. How drivers will handle driving with a virtually nonexistent spoiler. It should make cars a handful on the weathered pavement that will be replaced after this race.
  2. Rebound stories from the Daytona 500. So many stars sputtered (some through no fault of their own) at Daytona, this could be a statement race for many. Last season, defending series champion Jimmie Johnson (who is coming off a forgettable Speedweeks similar to last year) used a strategy play to snooker Kevin Harvick and send a message that the No. 48 Chevy would have the resilience to win its seventh championship.

Jerry Bonkowski: Ford dominated much of the Daytona 500 but that was on a restrictor-plate track. How will the blue oval fare on one of the fastest mile-and-a-half tracks in the sport? And what will Stewart-Haas Racing do for an encore after its first race with the new manufacturer?

Dustin Long: I’m really intrigued with how inspection will go throughout the weekend. There was a good bit of talk in the garage about how tough NASCAR was in inspection at Daytona. A number of teams had to go through inspection more than once before the race. I want to see how this impacts qualifying. How many cars will be going through inspection when qualifying begins? How will that impact their qualifying if they don’t have as much time on-track? If they start at the rear, how challenging will it be for them to get toward the front by the first stage to score points? What happens in inspection could play a role in what happens to a team throughout the weekend.

Watch Dale Jarrett on NASCAR America today from 5:30 – 6 p.m. ET on NBCSN.