Podcast: Dale Earnhardt Jr. and Steve Letarte go deep on hot-button topics

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In the debut of a new post-“Wednesdays with Dale” podcast, NASCAR America analysts Dale Earnhardt Jr. and Steve Letarte had extended discussions about topics on Wednesday’s show.

You can hear the podcast by clicking on the audio embed below, but here are some snippets from what the former crew chief-driver tandem said during the freewheeling conversation:


On the postrace dash to the airport that began with Earnhardt’s late father and others from that generation …

Earnhardt on the trend’s origins: “There was a bit of a hurry just to be home quicker, but there also was a huge element at play with their egos, with Rusty (Wallace) and Dad particularly. Dad and Rusty competed on everything. They literally were like racing home in their planes the same way they ran the race all day. It was always who could get in the air first.”

Letarte: “My man Jeff Burton can get out of a sportcoat like Superman. In the phone booth, out of the phone booth, he’s gone.”

Earnhardt: “I remember going to races with (his father) before I started driving and seeing him start to drive home in his driver’s suit. It’s like that first 15 miles within the circumference of the racetrack, if you can break out of that traffic bubble sooner than anyone else … once you’re beyond that bubble, you’re good to go.”

Letarte: “If you’re first out of the bubble, you’re first to the airport, and once you’re the leader, you’re the leader all day.”


On an Xfinity race they ran together at Texas Motor Speedway (probably in 2014) in which they started off horrendously slow …

Earnhardt on Letarte being his crew chief in two series the same weekend: “That says a lot about me as a driver that you were not so tired of me on the Cup side that you were like, ‘You know what? I don’t think I’ll do that. I’m really getting enough of you on the Cup side.’ You said, ‘Yes! Yes, Dale! More racing with Dale? Of course!’”

Letarte: “We were getting our teeth kicked in in practice.”

Earnhardt: “We realized it quickly in the first 15 minutes. I’m like, ‘Hey, driving OK! Feels pretty good!’ He’s like, ‘Well I got some bad news. You’re half a second slow! Not a little bit! We’re in trouble!’  … We were starting to panic. I made this uncharacteristically low entry into Turn 3, and it chopped a half-second off the lap.”

Letarte: “And instantly, I was like, ‘Hey, that’s way better.’ And the response was, ‘Oh, yeah, we’re pretty good, I’ve been driving it all wrong.’ We went from throwing up slow to one good lap to let’s go back to the Cup garage, we’ll be fine.”


On Brad Keselowski’s comments about the need for drivers to be outspoken

Letarte on whether a crew chief would prefer a driver toe the line: “I’ve only had two (drivers). I had Jeff Gordon and Dale Jr. Both spoke their mind, both were very transparent, they endorsed products that endorsed them and matched their brands and personalities. It all worked. I enjoyed it because both also would have a conversation where it’s more than just the fans. I guess the short answer is yes. I enjoy a driver who is speaking their mind because if you’re always you, all the time, even though it’s sometimes rockier, you’re going to get in less major issues because you are who you are. People don’t think you’re two-faced or saying something behind your back. I will qualify that by saying both drivers I worked with who were that way, I could call on the phone and say hey, I know you think this, but I just want to paint the picture of what could be perceived of internally in our family while we try to go race, and both of them would say oh man, I never thought of that. They were both very supportive.”

Earnhardt on whether sponsorship can hinder drivers speaking freely compared with other sports: “NBA players do have to consider the partnerships that they have, but when you’re LeBron James, you have so much strength. Your brand is so freaking strong, it doesn’t affect him as much.

“I think that with drivers, I think they’re a little more concerned not so much with how the fans may react, but they probably do think more about, ‘Oh man, my sponsor may not like this, how much job security do I have? Am I willing to risk my career on making a statement?’

“Brad doesn’t seem to care. I might be wrong. This might not be true every driver. But I think if you adopt that approach, a lot of people buy in, a lot of people buy in to who Brad is, that’s Brad. Nobody’s shocked. His sponsors aren’t going to wake up and say, ‘Wait a minute!’ They know who they’re getting. That’s who Brad is. Him being that way has gotten to become what we expect from Brad, so it’s not so shocking to see his owner or corporate partners see him get into those situations.”

Click on the embed above to hear the podcast.

It also is available on Apple Podcasts.

 

NASCAR America: How Dale Jr. will introduce his daughter to Dale Sr.

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When Dale Earnhardt Jr. needed to describe his father to wife Amy, he had her sit down to watch the 2007 documentary “Dale.” He expects to do the same thing when it comes time to introduce his daughter to her legendary grandfather.

“I’ll be honest with you; I’ll probably set her down and have her watch the Dale movie,” Earnhardt said. “They made this movie called ‘Dale’ a long time ago and that was the only way I could help Amy understand exactly who Dad was. I could try my hardest to tell her stories, show her videos or pictures, but that Dale movie really captures him better than anything else.”

Junior also commented on who the Washington Redskins should pick during the first round of the NFL draft and whether his dog Gus can catch a Frisbee.

For more watch the video above.

NASCAR America returns to NBCSN on Monday, February 26

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NASCAR America, NBCSN’s daily motorsports show, returns for its fifth season this Monday, February 26 at 5 p.m. ET. The season premiere will provide complete coverage of this weekend’s triple-header action at the year’s first mile-and-a-half track, Atlanta Motor Speedway.

NASCAR on NBC reporter Marty Snider (@HeyMartysnider) will host NASCAR America next week, from NBC Sports Group’s headquarters in Stamford, Conn., alongside NASCAR on NBC analyst and the “Mayor” of NASCAR Jeff Burton (@JeffBurton), and Daytona 500-winning crew chief Steve Letarte (@SteveLetarte).

The 2018 NASCAR America season will feature regular appearances by NASCAR on NBC’s newest crew member Dale Earnhardt Jr. (@Dalejr), as well as Hall of Fame driver Dale Jarrett (@DaleJarrett) and auto racing icon Kyle Petty (@KylePetty). NASCAR on NBC’s pre- and post-race host Krista Voda (@kristavoda), and studio host Carolyn Manno (@carolynmanno), also return as regular hosts of NASCAR America.

NBCSports.com’s lead motorsports writer Nate Ryan (@nateryan), features reporter Rutledge Wood (@rutledgewood), in addition to reporters Kelli Stavast (@KelliStavast), Dave Burns (@tvdaveburns) and Parker Kligerman (@pkligerman) will also return to contribute regular reports and features.

In 2018, NASCAR America will also bring back its extended series My Home Track: 50 States in 50 Shows. Crossing the country alphabetically from Alabama to Wyoming, the favorite series will showcase and celebrate local race tracks and racing communities in all 50 states across the country.

Airing each weeknight at 5 p.m. ET, NASCAR America will include in-studio driver interviews, regular interviews with crew members from race shops across the Monster Energy NASCAR Cup and Xfinity Series, regular live i-racing simulator segments, and weekly deep dive Scan All segments with audio from each race weekend.

NASCAR America originates from NBC Sports Group’s headquarters in Stamford, Conn., with contributions from NBC Sports Charlotte, in Charlotte, N.C., Burton’s Garage, in Huntersville, N.C., and the NASCAR Hall of Fame in Charlotte, allowing the show to report directly from NASCAR’s heartland.

NASCAR America is also available on the NBC Sports app – NBC Sports Group’s live streaming product for desktops, mobile devices, tablets, and connected TV’s.

Forbes’ annual NASCAR report: Team values dip slightly, but sport is still strong overall

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The value of NASCAR teams dipped slightly in the last year, but the sport is still strong overall — and has increased promise and growth going forward with things such as young drivers and social media/video engagement.

Also, last season’s top-12 highest-paid NASCAR Cup drivers earned a collective $155 million between them.

Those are among the conclusions from Forbes magazine in its annual analysis of NASCAR team values and driver salaries, released Thursday.

“The top eight NASCAR teams are now worth an average $158 million, down 2 percent from last year,” Forbes reports.

Hendrick Motorsports remains the most valuable organization in the sport, leading the way in both team value ($325 million) and 2016 Revenue (the most recent results available) of $180 million.

Joe Gibbs Racing is second ($220 million team value, $131 million in 2016 revenue), followed by Stewart-Haas Racing ($175 team value, $109 million in 2016 revenue).

Among Forbes’ other observations:

* There is concern that several sponsors have left the sport in the last two years, including Target, Subway, Cheerios, Coors Light and Dollar General. Also, some of NASCAR’s biggest current sponsors are reducing their racing budgets. Forbes cites as an example Miller Lite, which has sponsored Team Penske for nearly 30 years, but will see its sponsorship slip from 24 races to just 11 races per season in its new contract extension with the team.

* On a more positive note, the story talks about the increasing impact of young drivers in the sport, particularly in light of major stars retiring over the last two years including Jeff Gordon, Tony Stewart and Dale Earnhardt Jr.

* Another good sign: “Digital fan engagement numbers are up as well. Last season social engagements increased 12 percent year-over-year, while video views saw a 44 percent increase. Stage racing was strongly supported, with around four out of five NASCAR fans preferring it to the prior format.”

Here’s Forbes’ list of NASCAR teams with the most value and their 2016 Revenue:

  1. Hendrick Motorsports, Team value: $325 million, 2016 Revenue: $180 million
  2. Joe Gibbs Racing, Team value: $220 million, 2016 revenue: $131 million
  3. Stewart-Haas Racing, Team value: $175 million, 2016 Revenue: $109 million
  4. Richard Childress Racing, Team value: $170 million, 2016 Revenue: $145 million
  5. Team Penske, Team value: $142 million; 2016 Revenue: $63 million
  6. Roush Fenway Racing, Team value: $140 million, 2016 Revenue: $97 million
  7. Chip Ganassi Racing, Team value: $68 million, 2016 Revenue: $49 million
  8. Front Row Motorsports, Team value: $21 million, 2016 Revenue: $19 million

Also, Forbes lists NASCAR’s 12 highest-paid drivers from 2017:

  1. Dale Earnhardt Jr., 2017 Total earnings $22 million, 2017 Salary/winnings $14 million
  2. Jimmie Johnson, 2017 Total earnings $19.2 million, 2017 Salary/winnings $14.2 million
  3. Kyle Busch, 2017 Total earnings $14.7 million, 2017 Salary/winnings $13.1 million
  4. Denny Hamlin, 2017 Total earnings $14.6 million, 2017 Salary/winnings $12.9 million
  5. Kevin Harvick, 2017 Total earnings $13.8 million, 2017 Salary/winnings $11.6 million
  6. Brad Keselowski, 2017 Total earnings $11.2 million, 2017 Salary/winnings $9.8 million
  7. Kasey Kahne, 2017 Total earnings $11.2 million, 2017 Salary/winnings $9.8 million
  8. Danica Patrick, 2017 Total earnings $10.3 million, 2017 Salary/winnings $5.8 million
  9. Joey Logano, 2017 Total earnings $10.2 million, 2017 Salary/winnings $8.6 million
  10. Kyle Larson, 2017 Total earnings $10.1 million, 2017 Salary/winnings $9 million
  11. Martin Truex Jr., 2017 Total earnings $9.9 million, 2017 Salary/winnings $8.9 million
  12. Matt Kenseth, 2017 Total earnings $9 million, 2017 Salary/winnings $7.9 million

Click here to read the full story.

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Video: Dale Earnhardt Jr. dishes on Kyle Busch’s comments, Super Bowl

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Dale Earnhardt Jr., just back from his Super Bowl trip for NBC, taped his Dale Jr. Download podcast in front of NBC cameras, and you can watch some of the footage here.

To hear the entire podcast, go to the Dale Jr. Dirty Mo Download site.

Earnhardt, who will be heading to the Winter Olympics in South Korea soon for his next NBC assignment, had much to discuss about his trip to Minneapolis for the Super Bowl, from the behind-the-scene stories of spending a day doing various outdoor activities with Rutledge Wood to having Jimmy Fallon bless his baby.

As it was Earnhardt’s first podcast of the year, he also delved into NASCAR issues and discussed the recent comments by Kyle Busch and other drivers about how NASCAR markets its competitors.

Check out Earnhardt’s podcast for much more. Check out the videos above and below for Earnhardt’s stories and takes on NASCAR happenings.