brent dewar

Photo by Jared C. Tilton/Getty Images

NASCAR President discusses new manufacturers, night racing at Martinsville

8 Comments

NASCAR President Brent Dewar said Tuesday that deadlines have passed for a new manufacturer to be a part of the sport in 2019, meaning the earliest Chevrolet, Ford and Toyota could face additional competition will be 2020.

Dewar made his comments on “The Morning Drive’’ on SiriusXM NASCAR Radio. He discussed that, night racing at Martinsville and other topics, taking questions from fans.

Asked about the chances of a new manufacturer in the sport, Dewar said:

“There’s a demand for it, I will say that. We’ve been in talks with two or three natural manufacturers that would be the natural next choice. We’ve got a lot data that we share with them. Our fans would like other manufacturers in the sport. Actually, the three (manufacturers) in the sport embrace it.

“We’re not looking for somebody to come in for two years. If you look at Ford, Chevrolet and Toyota, they’ve made huge commitments and investments. … This is a place to bring your R&D and technology and engage with the fans. If you do it, the right way, there’s no better platform than NASCAR to get a return on that investment.

“Because of the entry points, we passed the ’19 (submission deadlines). The earliest would be 2020. That’s the process we’re working on. … There’s genuine, sincere interest because of the size of the platform and what we’re doing. They like the innovation and change and they’re encouraged that the (manufacturers) have a voice in the manufacturers council.’’

Dewar was asked about the possibility of a night race at Martinsville Speedway now that the track has lights.

“We really applaud them for the investment they made,’’ Dewar said. “It looks great. It gives us the opportunity to do a night race should we get to that.

“It’s really about balancing the schedule of when we have availability at our two broadcast partners, Fox and NBC. To a lot of the fans, they don’t realize the complexity that goes into sports programming.

“We’re a very important sport for both of our partners. We have to be fitted in exactly right to drive and we drive their metrics on a daily basis. It’s a balancing act. We, the sanctioning body would be delighted to race a night race at Martinsville, we’ve just got to be able to find a right fit.’’

Dewar was asked how NASCAR determines what races should be at night and what races run at day.

“What we look at, candidly, it’s not night racing for night racing or day racing, it has to be a combination of the ambient temperatures where we’re at, the type of the track we have and the ability to have a great race. Some of the tracks will lend themselves to incredible night racing.’’

Dewar also was asked why the roval at Charlotte Motor Speedway wasn’t first used in the All-Star Race instead of making its debut as the cutoff race in the first round of the playoffs.

“I think part of the challenge this year was the turnover time to get it done,’’ Dewar said. “I think in the future years, those can be other options. We like the drama that is going to be presented by it. Our drivers are great road-course drivers today. I think it’s going to be a real test to them.’’

 and on Facebook

NASCAR Chairman Brian France upbeat Monster Energy will remain beyond 2018

Photo by Jonathan Ferrey/Getty Images
1 Comment

NASCAR Chairman Brian France expressed optimism Tuesday that Monster Energy will remain as series sponsor after this season and said that the Cup Series could use one more manufacturer.

France made his comments on “SiriusXM Speedway” on SiriusXM NASCAR Radio.

Monster Energy, which completed its first year as series sponsor in 2017, was to have informed NASCAR by Dec. 31 if it would remain beyond the 2018 season. NASCAR President Brent Dewar said last month that the sanctioning body agreed to extend that deadline

“They have had a really good run with us, and we’ve had a good run with them, and my hope and feeling is that that’s going to continue,’’ France said Tuesday. “They’ve been good partners. They’re bringing a lot to the sport. They’ve got a lot on their plate and so do we. We’re working with them to make sure that we have as long an agreement as we can. I think we will. I think it’s working that good for everybody. I’m real pleased with it.’’

Asked by “SiriusXM Speedway” host Dave Moody if there is a deadline on when Monster Energy must inform NASCAR of its decision, France said:

“There’s always that, but we just look at our partners differently. We work though everything. Everything to us is long term, whatever that means in a given relationship. My sense is that it has really worked for everybody. It’s also new. They’ve only been here, my goodness, just completed the first year. They’re working out some things and that’s understandable. It’s all good, actually really good with those guys. Love those guys.’’

Last month, Rodney Sacks, chairman and chief executive officer of Monster Beverage Corp., said during an investor meeting that the company was “evaluating” its future with NASCAR.

Sacks was asked in that meeting about the return on its investments, including NASCAR.

“I think that we have been quite successful,’’ Sacks said. “I think we have got a lot more visibility, a lot more recognition for the brand through the NASCAR sponsorship. It’s very extensive. It’s on TV. It’s appearing on the talk shows. We look at the metrics that the NASCAR folks give us and it certainly does seem to have been enhanced. Now to what degree, that we don’t know.

“Certainly we do believe we have been able to increase penetration but again it takes some time. I think we really started in NASCAR at the beginning of the year — very, very quick decision to go into NASCAR (and) it took us a little bit of time to get up to speed and get our activation going. We think we’ll see lot clearer benefits and more benefits coming from that relationship this year.’’

As for manufacturers, France said he felt there was room for one more in the Cup Series to join Chevrolet, Ford and Toyota.

“There’s a lot of work going on on that. Clearly we believe that the sport could not only absorb but welcome another manufacturer. These are tricky things to do. They’re very difficult to pull off. We’re just going to work toward that goal. I believe over time we’re the best opportunity not only in North America, maybe the world in terms of motorsports. We’re going to be aggressive in talking to other manufacturers as we go down the road.’’

Why just one more manufacturer?

“I think there is a limit,’’ France told SiriusXM NASCAR Radio. “There’s only so many key teams that a manufacturer can get their hands on and that takes time,’’ he said. “They want to have good performance and the right team alignments. Most importantly, they want to align themselves to the right teams and sometimes the teams aren’t available to do that.

“Using the Toyota approach that they had, that took them a long time to be competitive. I think the next manufacturer would probably like to shorten that timeline a little bit and be more competitive quicker. We will get another manufacturer, but it’s one step at a time.’’

 and on Facebook

Ben Kennedy named general manager of Truck Series in NASCAR executive moves

Getty Images
Leave a comment

NASCAR announced multiple leadership moves Tuesday, including the naming of Ben Kennedy as general manager of the Camping World Truck Series.

Kennedy, a former Truck Series driver, is the nephew of NASCAR CEO and Chairman Brian France and son of International Speedway Corporation’s CEO, Lesa France Kennedy.

Kennedy, 26, will work closely with Brad Moran, the managing director of the Truck Series and Jeff Wohlschlaeger, managing director of series marketing. He will report to Elton Sawyer, vice president of competition.

“Ben will draw upon his years of experience across NASCAR’s grassroots and national series to bring valuable commercial and competition insights to our NASCAR Camping World Truck Series,” said NASCAR President Brent Dewar in a press release. With promising young drivers and experienced veterans battling it out in close, side-by-side racing, Ben truly understands from experience that every lap matters and we are excited about his future leadership in this important national series.”

Kennedy has made 73 starts in the Truck Series and 17 in the Xfinity Series. In 2016, he earned his lone Truck Series win at Bristol Motor Speedway, becoming the first member of the France family to win a national NASCAR race.

MORE: Spotlight Q&A with Ben Kennedy

NASCAR also announced it has appointed Jim Cassidy to the new role of chief international officer. Cassidy was previously the vice president of racing operations.

In his new role, Cassidy will oversee all international competition and commercial operations, which includes the Pinty’s Series in Canada, the PEAK Mexico Series and the Whelen Euro Series.

“NASCAR racing is broadcast in over 185 countries and territories, with race fans engaging stock car racing in person at events in Canada, Mexico and across Europe,” Cassidy said in a press release. “The demand for NASCAR racing internationally has never been stronger and we look forward to bringing our sport closer to race fans everywhere.”

Cassidy will report to Steve O’Donnell, executive vice president and chief racing development officer.

“Jim brings nearly two decades of racing operations and industry leadership experience,” O’Donnell said in the press release. “He has worked tirelessly to grow our existing motorsports properties outside of the U.S and will lead our efforts to identify important growth opportunities internationally for our sport and its growing fanbase.”

Joining Cassidy in his efforts will be:

  • Chad Seigler as vice president of international business development
  • Celeste Griffin-Churchill as senior director, international
  • Joe Balash as director, international competition
  • Bob Duvall as senior director, international & weekly/touring business development

 and on Facebook

Monster Energy ‘evaluating’ NASCAR sponsorship beyond 2018 season

Getty Images
2 Comments

Monster Energy is “evaluating’’ its NASCAR sponsorship and if to remain with the series beyond this season, Rodney Sacks, chairman and chief executive officer of Monster Beverage Corp., said at an investor meeting Thursday.

NASCAR President Brent Dewar said earlier this month on Motor Racing Network’s “NASCAR Live” that the sanctioning body has given Monster Energy an extension to determine if it wants to remain the series sponsor after this season.

Last year marked Monster Energy’s first year as series sponsor. The company reportedly has a two-year deal with a two-year option.

At the investor meeting Thursday, Sacks said of its NASCAR sponsorship:

“We also commenced this last year with a principle NASCAR sponsorship, as I’m sure you’re aware. That was an interesting change for us. I think it afforded us extensive exposure to many more consumers who would not ordinarily have followed the sports we have been active in.

“We are continuing our sponsorship this year of NASCAR. We are evaluating where we are with the NASCAR sponsorship going forward in ’19 and thereafter. We’re busy in discussions at the moment with NASCAR and looking at and deciding what will be the best way forward for us as a brand. Certainly this year we’re fully vested and we’re excited about the opportunity for the brand and continuing to establish our presence in NASCAR and with the NASCAR consumer.’’

Monster Energy also is a sponsor of reigning Daytona 500 champion Kurt Busch.

Four-time Formula 1 champion Lewis Hamilton and NHRA Top Fuel champion Brittany Force are among the Monster Energy athletes. The company sponsors a number of athletes set to compete in the Winter Olympics, primarily in skiing and snowboarding. Monster Energy also increased its sponsorship in the Professional Bull Riders to be the title sponsor this year of the series in the U.S., Australia, Brazil and Canada. UFC announced this week that it has renewed its global partnership with Monster Energy with a multi-year extension.

 and on Facebook

NASCAR President discusses status of Monster Energy, new manufacturers

Photo by Jared C. Tilton/Getty Images
6 Comments

NASCAR has given Monster Energy an extension to determine if it wants to remain the Cup series sponsor.

NASCAR President Brent Dewar revealed that Tuesday night in an appearance on Motor Racing Network’s “NASCAR Live” show.

Among the other topics Dewar, who is entering his fifth season at NASCAR, discussed was the effort to bring new manufacturers and how soon one could arrive, any tweaks to stage racing and the new pit stop rules.

Last year marked Monster Energy’s first season as series sponsor. The two sides agreed to a deal about two months before the 2017 Daytona 500. The company reportedly has a two-year deal with a two-year option. Monster Energy has not stated if it will return after this season.

Asked about Monster Energy’s status, Dewar told the MRN radio show:

“They signed late in the season (Dec. 2016). I worked with them very closely in bringing them to the sport. They were just looking to have a full season. They had to Dec. 31 (to determine if to agree to the renewal). We’ve given them an extension to go through the evaluation.

“There’s no question it was a great season with them and any kind of metric that we run we hit the ball out the park with them. They’re different. We’re excited. … It was the right thing to do to give them a little more time to evaluate. We’re letting them do that. We’d love for them to stay for many years, but if they choose not to, we’ve got a great product, we’ll continue on in that regards. There are meetings coming up. For the fans that have had a chance to go to the Monster activities prior to the race, they are a lot of fun. I’ve taken my guests that come to the race and we’ve had a great time experiencing how they demonstrate their brand in a very thoughtful, unique way. We love having them around.’’

Among the other topics Dewar discussed:

Chevrolet, Ford and Toyota are the only manufacturers in the Cup Series. The last time NASCAR had four manufacturers in Cup was 2012 when Dodge was a part of the series.

Dewar was asked by host Mike Bagley about the interest of other manufacturers and when any might come to NASCAR:

“Nothing to announce right now on the manufacturer front,’’ Dewar said. “We have a cadence to come in. The earliest one would be able to join would be 2020. We have entry ramps that come in. We have been in conversations with a number of manufacturers. … The platform is strong and it shows a strong (return of investment) potential for manufacturers to bring their products and come race with us.’’

Asked if NASCAR had a magic number of how many manufacturers it would like in Cup, Dewar said:

“I think optimally four or five is the right number for what we’re looking at. We’ve got a great series in sports car that focuses primary on the luxury brands. That is the IMSA Series. The NASCAR series is the mass brands, the Toyotas the Chevrolets,  and the Fords and their competitors. We think there are a couple of more brands in America that would be perfectly suited to come join us and race against their competitors. We work very hard at keeping the sport in front of them. We had a number of them at the track last year, joining us, seeing the events and the direction where we’re taking the sport. It’s a work in progress and it’s one of the ones that I personally lead.’’

Dewar on any tweaks to stage racing in 2018:

“We’re really happy with stage racing. I think it was a good example of the collaboration where the industry came together with the idea of stage racing, so we’re very happy with that.’’

On if NASCAR is trying to address the number of caution laps after a stage ends and before the next stage begins, Dewar said:

“I think we’ll continue to modify it. We’ve done a lot research on this. When you have 80 million fans we’re going to have people with an opinion on everything, but I don’t think it’s as concerning as maybe some of the conversation at this point. We continue to fine tune and look at how to refine and make those adjustments. We bring the councils (driver council, owner council, etc) together  and that’s one of the things that we have on our list to continue to discuss.’’

On the objective of cutting pit crews from six to five in 2018, Dewar said:

“We’ve focused very strongly on our star power of the drivers, but it’s really evolved over the time period we’ve gone to low downforce on the cars and a lot of the strategy that has gone into it. We really want to emphasize it’s the team. It’s the crew chief and the driver, but it’s the team that brings it together. … What we love about NASCAR is the pit stops and so this effort of five over the wall and the crew and identifying the pit crew with their numbers at the track, you’ll start to see and understand the names of the people that make a championship team, a high quality team, that’s the method behind it, that’s the logic behind what we’re trying to achieve. I think what you’ll see with five over the wall and the rules we have is we’ll really to start to focus on the athleticism, these great athletes that are really unlike any other motorsports that will be coming over the wall.’’

On the how eliminating one pit crew position will change pit stops, Dewar said:

“Pit stops are still going to be very fast, but they’re going to be a little bit slower so we can accentuate really what is happening. It’s almost too fast in some respects to capture it. We’re excited about this and what the athletes are going to be able to demonstrate because it makes a difference. A driver absolutely makes a difference. A crew chief makes a difference and so does everyone that participates at the track. Then you couple that back with the folks at the shop. It’s part of the storylines we think have been missing in the sport, particularly for the casual fan. The hardcore fans understand this, but for the sport to grow we need to start demonstrating the team not just the quarterback.’’

On the Cup Series having qualifying on the same day before a race, Dewar said:

“We like the tighter schedule, and I think there was a little bit of miscommunication as we went into it last year about two-day weekends. They’re not two-day weekends. We were just trying to be more thoughtful of the schedule at the Cup level and to allow more time and space for the Xfinity and Camping World (Truck) series when we might have three (in a weekend).

“I think the challenge this year was really on same-day qualifying with the race. We were actually pretty fortunate. We thought it through. There’s really not enough turnaround time in many cases. I think you’ll see less of that (this year). Also what we learned and we hadn’t really thought about it was the track goes hot all day and one of the most exciting things for the fans is the cold pass opportunity to get down on the track and to get that experience if you’re only coming for one day on Sunday, so I think you’ll see more of the Saturday qualifying for the Sunday (race) for the Cup and we’ll try to manage that. There’s still a lot of efficiencies we can work on. We’re just trying to find the right balance to give the best fan experience.’’

 and on Facebook