NASCAR on NBC podcast

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NASCAR on NBC podcast, Ep. 96: Clint Bowyer on improving the race fan experience

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As a high-energy Type A personality who always is seeking ways to stay occupied, Clint Bowyer occasionally spends down time at racetracks keeping tabs on fans’ down time.

During a recent episode of the NASCAR on NBC podcast, the Stewart-Haas Racing driver explained how he likes touring the infield during race weekends to understand the fan experience.

“It’s about the experience,” Bowyer said. “It’s not about a race or practice or qualifying. It bums me out when I see people at a lull or void in our program. They just look like they don’t know what to do with themselves.”

Bowyer does think there have been some improvements made this season, starting with the reconfiguring of the fan midway with the return of the merchandise haulers at many tracks. That has helped rebuild a “carnival-type feel” to make fans feel entertained, Bowyer said. “It’s not enough in today’s day and age just to be entertained now and then. You’ve got to have something for these people every single moment, every minute they’re at the racetrack.”

He also approves of Indianapolis Motor Speedway’s hosting and promotion of concerts with bands such as the Chainsmokers.

“They’ve learned how to capture that young audience,” he said. “Everyone says our demographic is getting older, getting long in the tooth. If you want to capture kids, 30-year-old guys, that’s me. It’s going to take a lot to keep me entertained for three days. You’ll have to have stuff going on, a party going on. I want to be entertained the whole time I’m there, and by the way, I’m a race fan. I want to see cars on the track.”

Bowyer owns a dirt late model race team and said the dirt racing experience also sets a good example.

“Those Late Models, they’re going to put on a great show for the fans,” he said. “There will be moments in that race that people will be talking about for weeks to come. That is something we’ve got to work on in our sport. We’ve got to create more moments that people come and talk about for weeks to come.”

You can listen to the podcast by clicking on the AudioBoom embed below or download and subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts by clicking here.

It also is available on Stitcher by clicking here and also can be found on Google Play, Spotify or wherever you get your podcasts.

The free subscriptions will provide automatic downloads of new episodes to your smartphone.

NASCAR on NBC podcast, Ep. 95: Krista Voda and Phil Kelley on TV and tractor pulling

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NASCAR on NBC host Krista Voda and her husband, Phil Kelley, joined the NASCAR on NBC podcast to discuss their hectic road life, chasing tractor pulls and TV assignments.

Kelley, who also works as a cameraman, is the driver-owner of the Red Blooded Binder tractor pulling team, which barnstorms around the country to county fairs for events throughout the summer.

He often has help in towing his race vehicle across the scales from Voda, who travels to races – often with their 4-year-old daughter.

“So much of our existence revolves around my career, and my schedule dictates so much of what we do,” Voda said. “So I kind of think it’s the least I can do that when we can travel as a family and be there together with Emmy, that’s what I like to do.”

You can listen to the podcast by clicking on the AudioBoom embed below or download and subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts by clicking here.

It also is available on Stitcher by clicking here and also can be found on Google Play, Spotify or wherever you get your podcasts.

The free subscriptions will provide automatic downloads of new episodes to your smartphone.

NASCAR on NBC podcast, Ep. 94: Danica Patrick on why ‘I don’t feel the weight of anything anymore’

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As she faces the most uncertain time of her NASCAR career, Danica Patrick sounds more secure in herself than ever.

During a recent episode of the NASCAR on NBC podcast, the Stewart-Haas Racing driver explained how she is growing more “Zen” in approaching middle age.

“I just don’t feel the weight of anything anymore,” Patrick, 35, said. “I just don’t feel angry about anything. It’s just gone. There are plenty of things I look back and think, ‘That sucked, but you know what? I’m going to go on’.

“And the things that make you the happiest are free. Do I love going on a private jet? Sure. Do I love going to really fancy vacations with boutique hotels where you have your own 3,000 square feet? Do I love being able to treat people well by giving them gifts and buying them things? Yeah, of course. That’s all wonderful stuff, but nothing feels better than the joy of family, love and friends. The stupidest thing, when I watch my two dogs play, I’m so happy. I literally laugh out loud by myself.”

Patrick said he has taken to watching Oprah Winfrey’s “Super Soul Sunday” for inspiration in interviews with spiritual people.

“Have I been screwed out of millions of dollars over the years in different ways and different places? Yep,” she said. “Have I had heartache? Yep. Have I been disappointed in myself or other people? Yep. There’s been all kinds of that, but that’s life.”

There is much happening in Patrick’s life outside of the car. Her first book (“Pretty Intense”) will be released in January, and she already has made plans for a sequel. She has opened a Napa Valley vineyard (Somnium) that recently released its first Cabernet Sauvignon. She launched a “Warrior” athleisure line that will be sponsoring her No. 10 Ford at Richmond Raceway this weekend.

But Patrick has cautioned against the perception that the forays are evidence of an exit from NASCAR.

“They are not an escape plan, they are not a backup plan, they are purely extensions of things I already do,” she said. “They really are. What I love about racing is the art of it. I love the challenge, the journey. I love the work involved between a group of people to find success. Whether it be through my communication about how the car feels, then you make changes, and it gets better.

“There’s a journey in that. I also love the execution, the mental discipline, the setting someone up. The things it takes to put a whole race together. There’s nothing better than outsmarting someone out there. Those are the things I really enjoy about racing. I’ve never made it a mystery that I’m not into cars.”

Patrick said there is no timetable for solidifying a 2018 ride.

“Just go with the flow and see what comes up and feels right,” she said. “In the spiritual laws of success, the two laws that are most important are the law of detachment and of least resistance. They’re similar.”

You can listen to the podcast by clicking on the AudioBoom embed below or download and subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts by clicking here.

It also is available on Stitcher by clicking here and also can be found on Google Play, Spotify or wherever you get your podcasts.

The free subscriptions will provide automatic downloads of new episodes to your smartphone.

NASCAR on NBC podcast, Ep. 93: Jamie McMurray on how driver rivalries have changed

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Jamie McMurray says rivalries haven’t disappeared from NASCAR, they just are getting harder to discern.

As a guest on a recent episode of the NASCAR on NBC podcast, the Chip Ganassi Racing driver, who entered Cup in 2002, talked about how his generation had changed their approaches on the track as their lives changed off it (noting “a different vibe in the bus lot” with many of his peers having kids).

“We have learned retaliation isn’t necessarily the best way to get back at someone,” McMurray said. “When I first started racing, some people wrecked people intentionally. Everyone is smarter now. Odds are if you wreck somebody, they will wreck you back the next week, and you didn’t gain anything by it.

“So for the most part, when you want to get back at someone, you race them differently, you block on pit road. There are things that can happen that maybe fans don’t see that hurt the other guy. I feel like those two drivers know why it’s happening and the reason behind it, but it’s not one of those things where you get out and throw your helmet on pit road.”

McMurray, who turned 41 in June, cited the aftermath of a recent run-in at Indianapolis Motor Speedway with Kurt Busch (a former teammate at Roush Fenway Racing) as an example.

“At Indy, I made it three wide on a restart,” McMurray said. “At Pocono, (Busch) came up to me and said something that didn’t go well. I texted him after the race and said, ‘Look I’m sorry, I didn’t handle that the right way. I’ve been friends with you for 15 years.’ Then we texted back and forth, and he’s like, ‘Man, it’s just part of racing.’ He was just mad. You definitely handle things differently when you’re 40 than you do when you’re 25. You grow up and learn from your mistakes.”

McMurray also sees differences in how the younger crop of drivers led by Kyle Larson, Ryan Blaney and Chase Elliott are choosing to race veterans.

“I feel like all of those guys were really smart in that they gave a lot initially,” he said. “Once you give in one or two times, I think the guy who’s been there a while knows that, and then it’s all equal. Ryan and Chase and Larson are all really smart racers. They’ve all done a really good job of not poking the bear. They’re really fun to race with now.”

During the podcast, McMurray also opened up on:

–Why he recently posted biometric data comparing his heart rate from a marathon bike ride to a Cup race at New Hampshire;

–The fitness trend in NASCAR;

–Why he enjoys observing social media but doesn’t participate in it;

–How he’d like NASCAR to open up its rulebook and lessen punishments.

You can listen to the podcast by clicking on the AudioBoom embed below or download and subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts by clicking here.

It also is available on Stitcher by clicking here and also can be found on Google Play, Spotify or wherever you get your podcasts.

The free subscriptions will provide automatic downloads of new episodes to your smartphone.

NASCAR on NBC podcast, Ep. 92: Matt DiBenedetto on making a name for himself

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Go Fas Racing driver Matt DiBenedetto was a recent guest of the NASCAR on NBC podcast, offering why he believes he can become a fan favorite like friend Dale Earnhardt Jr.

“I think I’ve had to go about my whole racing career on such a difficult path and the old school way, it makes me appreciate it way more,” DiBenedetto said on the podcast. “The fans have been a big part of me getting here and getting sponsors and embracing my story. I do appreciate them way more.

“It’s not that hard to just have fun with them. Not knocking anybody, but I look up to someone like Dale Jr. because he’s just genuine, he’s himself. That’s all you really need to do, you don’t need to act like someone different. Just be your normal old self. They’re just people. You don’t need to act like a huge celebrity and just fly by them. All I do is have fun with them, be different, take videos with them. They love that stuff.”

The Grass Valley, California, native is among the more creative and proactive drivers on social media across multiple platforms, including Earnhardt in some of his Snaps.

DiBenedetto believes his savvy will set him apart with more success.

“That’s why I have that vision that I know I can be a fan favorite,” he said. “I’m not going to fill Dale Jr.’s shoes. But I feel like if I’m in a position to win races, and we have that kind of media attention, I feel like I can darn near take over the world because it’s all about being different, and I’m different than other people.”

Earnhardt often jokes with DiBenedetto about the pronunciation of his last name (and had fun with it on his team radio last year, leading to a SiriusXM Satellite Radio clip that DiBenedetto reacts to during the podcast). But the Hendrick Motorsports driver also has been an asset, promoting DiBenedetto as among NASCAR’s most underrated drivers.

“I’ll mess with (Earnhardt), ‘Hey since you think so much of me, go ahead and put me in the 88,’” DiBenedetto joked. “Tony Stewart also has helped me and given me advice. It’s cool to have all these people on your side, so if you need to lean on them for advice or favors or help, that’s not going to hurt in the long run in my career.”

In the podcast, DiBenedetto also discusses:

–His underfunded team’s top 10s in the Daytona 500 and Brickyard 400;

–The gamble by his family to relocate to Hickory, North Carolina, to give him a shot at a racing career;

–What life is like on the road for one of the only full-time Cup drivers without a motorhome.

You can listen to the podcast by clicking on the AudioBoom embed below or download and subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts by clicking here.

It also is available on Stitcher by clicking here and also can be found on Google Play, Spotify or wherever you get your podcasts.

The free subscriptions will provide automatic downloads of new episodes to your smartphone.