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Friday 5: How soon until the next female driver arrives in Cup?

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Danica Patrick’s departure after the Daytona 500 (provided she secures a ride for that race) will leave NASCAR without a female driver in its top series.

It could be years before the next female driver arrives in Cup.

Only two of the 114 drivers who attempted to qualify for an Xfinity race last year were female — Angela Ruch ran four races and Jennifer Jo Cob ran one. Cobb was the only female driver among 103 who attempted to qualify for a Camping World Truck Series race last season.

The last four NASCAR Next classes — which spotlights talented young competitors — featured four female drivers among the 44 racers selected. Those female drivers chosen: Kenzie Ruston (2014-15 class), Nicole Behar (2015-16), Julia Landauer (2016-17) and Hailie Deegan (2017-18).

The 16-year-old Deegan will run the K&N West Pro Series schedule for Bill MacAnally Racing, which has won the past three K&N West titles.

Landauer finished seventh in the points last year in the K&N West Series (after placing fourth in 2016) and Behar was eighth in her second full-time season in that series.

In ARCA, Natalie Decker will run the full season with Venturini Motorsports. She stands to become the fifth female in modern-day ARCA history to compete for a driver’s title, joining Shawna Robinson (2000), Christi Passmore (2003-04), Milka Duno (2013) and Sarah Cornett-Ching (2015).

Former champion crew chief Ray Evernham understands the challenges female drivers face. His wife, Erin, competed in 10 Xfinity races from 2005-06 and 29 Camping World Truck races between 2005-08.

“I think that we’ve got to keep providing opportunities for girls to get that experience,’’ said Evernham, who will be inducted into the NASCAR Hall of Fame on Jan. 19.

“Now with the technology of the cars, the way they’re doing the setups, things like that, it will make it a little bit easier for newer people to come in. But we’ve just got to continue to provide an opportunity or a path for ladies to get experience.

Just as important will be how well they’ll handle the scrutiny.

“I know it stinks that so many people are so critical of lady drivers, much more critical than they are of a male driver of the same performance,’’ Evernham said. “Each time one of those girls weathers that storm, gets a little bit further down the road, gets some credibility, it gets a lady closer to Victory Lane in NASCAR.’’

NASCAR lists 16 women who have competed in at least one Cup race from Louise Smith, Sara Christian and Ethel Mobley in 1949 to Patrick. Patrick’s 190 career Cup starts are more than the other 15 women combined. Janet Guthrie was next with 33 starts between 1976-80 and followed by Smith with 11 starts from 1949-52 and Robinson, who had eight starts from 2001-02.

Patrick and Robinson are the only females to run a Cup race since 1990.

NASCAR lists 22 females having competed in the Xfinity Series. Patty Moise started 133 races, more than any other driver.  Patrick and Robinson are next with 61 starts each, followed by Johanna Long (42 starts) and Jennifer Jo Cobb (29 starts).

2. “The Great American Race”

The phrase has long been used as the nickname for the Daytona 500, but where did it originate?

Australia.

True story.

Let Ken Squier, who will be among the five men inducted into the NASCAR Hall of Fame on Jan. 19, explain how he came up with the phrase for the race.

“Well, (Bill) France Sr. had me (in Daytona) from the ’60s.  Daytona always stood out separately, individually, for one thing, the time of year, because most race tracks in America were closed. 

“It was the gathering of the tribes in Daytona Beach, which went all the way back to the turn of the century, when Henry Ford, the Chevrolet brothers, all of that tribe went down there.  They raced down that hard‑packed beach. That never stopped.  One way or another, they continued to go down there in the month of February and toast a few of their friends from the past and turn some wheels.

“That spirit of Daytona is more prevalent than any other when you talk about tracks and parts of the country. In my mind, it needed something that set it aside. Indianapolis was always the greatest spectacle in sports. Indeed, it was.

“But what was Daytona? Well, it was All‑American stock cars in those days, and pretty much the neighbors sounded like your neighbors, particularly if you came from a small town. What would come to mind? I fooled around with that for a long time.

“I was in Australia doing a show. They had a great race over there. It was a long one, it was a dinger, and it was a national holiday. On the way home, I thought, God, that’s what Daytona is. It’s ‘The Great American Race.’

“I got chewed up pretty good about that. Hadn’t I ever heard of Indy? I sure as the dickens had. This was coming from a different place. Sure enough in 1959, when those three cars came across wheel‑to‑wheel at the end of 500 miles, that was The Great American Race.’’

3. Revamped pit stops

Martin Truex Jr. was asked this week about his thoughts on the changes to pit road with five people going over the wall to service the car instead of six this season.

Truex had an interesting take on what pit crew position might grow in importance with the change.

“I think there’s a lot of question marks from all teams, and I know there’s a lot of talk throughout teams and in the industry of how much different it is,’’ he said during a break in the Goodyear tire test at Texas Motor Speedway. “Everybody is going to think they have a handle on it and then somebody is going to do it different on pit road and whip everybody’s butt in Daytona, so then you’re going to have to re-learn everything and try and figure it out.

“From what I understand, it’s been really difficult. A lot of the weight falls on the jackman as far as making the stops go fast and when all that pressure gets put on one position it makes that one position really important and really different than it’s been in the past.’’

4. Las Vegas test

NASCAR has an organizational test at Las Vegas Motor Speedway on Jan. 31 and Feb. 1. That means that one team per organization is permitted at the test.

Among those scheduled to test are William Byron (Hendrick Motorsports), Kyle Larson (Chip Ganassi Racing), Brad Keselowski (Team Penske), Kurt Busch (Stewart-Haas Racing) and Erik Jones (Joe Gibbs Racing).

5. January racing

While the return of NASCAR can’t come soon enough for many, did you know the last time the Cup Series raced in January was 1981? Bobby Allison won at Riverside, California. That was the season-opening race and the Daytona 500 followed. Riverside opened the Cup season from 1970-81.

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Dale Earnhardt Jr. familiar with restrictor-plate wrecks and aftereffects

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For the first time in 16 years, Talladega Superspeedway will not have Dale Earnhardt Jr. in the field Sunday afternoon.

Earnhardt has been sidelined for the remainder of the season after suffering a concussion early this summer. With the final restrictor-plate race of the season looming, there is always the prospect of more heavy hits, and while Earnhardt, who has competed in the last 33 Talladega races, will be notably absent, he knows the dangers of superspeedway racing all too well.

Involved in a 25-car crash on the last lap in the October 2012 race, Earnhardt suffered a concussion that sidelined him for the next two weeks. In a recent interview with NBC Sports, Earnhardt recalled another restrictor-plate crash from early in his career that left him soldiering through the effects instead of seeking out a doctor.

“In ’98 I flipped at Daytona (in the Xfinity Series) and I came out of the infield care center stumbling around, just trying to do an interview falling over and just about passing out and never thought, ‘Oh, I’ve got a concussion, I need to get help; or maybe I should hide it,’” Earnhardt said. “I never thought anything, you’re just like, ‘All right, I’m hurt, this will go away.’

“I remember being in the shop the next week and I was working on my back inside the interior of the car and I felt like they had – the car was on caster wheels – and I thought that they had slung the car across the floor of the shop. I sat up saying, where are we going, when we hadn’t moved at all. It was like, ‘Oh, I’ll be fine, I’m tough.’ It’s just you didn’t know what the right thing to do was, you didn’t know, ‘Hey, I need to go see neurologist.’ I didn’t even know what the hell a neurologist was then.”

Earnhardt brought up the Daytona crash during an interview about drivers being more proactive about their health after taking a hard hit. Drivers Ryan Ellis and Sarah Cornett-Ching credit Earnhardt’s recent openness as being the reason they sought medical treatment instead of waiting for the symptoms to pass.

While Earnhardt understands a driver’s instinct of wanting to soldier through on their own, he doesn’t suggest it. Certainly not after receiving a better understanding of how advanced concussion treatment and doctor education has become the last few years. Although Sunday will be the second elimination race of the Chase, the major storyline centers around the expectation of carnage.

The May race at Talladega featured 10 cautions. Six of the 10 cautions were accidents that involved four or more cars. Chris Buescher and Matt Kenseth, in separate accidents, both flipped. At Daytona in July, there were five cautions. Three of them were multicar accidents.

“But I think the fact that maybe these people are saying, OK, I see now what I need to do when this happens, whereas before you didn’t even know what to do or who to see or how to treat it or how to handle that kind of deal,” Earnhardt said. “So anytime you got your head banged you kind of waited for it to get better. But now you can go see people; you can get specific exercises that treat exactly the type of injury your brain has. The doctors have learned so much in the last 10 years that it’s great for folks like us who know when we get hurt can go, ‘I know what to do.’ I know what to do, who to see, and this is going to be good.”

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Sarah Cornett-Ching moves up from ARCA to K&N Pro Series East in 2016

(Photo courtesy Sarah Cornet-Ching Racing)
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A year ago, Sarah Cornett-Ching was working as a master welder in the remote hinterlands of northern Canada.

Today, Cornett-Ching is one of the most promising young drivers in stock car racing, with a bright future ahead of her.

That’s why it’s no surprise that after a strong rookie season in the ARCA Series in 2015 – including finishing seventh in the standings (an ARCA record for highest finish ever for a female driver), Cornett-Ching is moving on up to the NASCAR K&N Pro Series East in 2016.

She made the announcement recently on her web site.

Cornett-Ching will run for K&N East Rookie of the Year honors in 2016. She’ll also continue driving for team owner Tony Blanchard and RACE 101 as they join her in the climb from ARCA to the K&N series.

Cornett-Ching will also compete in select races in ARCA, as well as the CARS Super Late Model Tour.

“I’m really energized about running in the NASCAR K&N Pro Series,” Cornett-Ching said in a release. “We raced a handful of events with them last year, I really liked how the races were organized, the parity of the rules package and what it offered me as a driver.”

The 24-year-old Summerland, British Columbia resident has shown great promise in her climb up the racing ladder. The K&N Series is the next step in her evolution as a racer.

“As my career continues to advance, I’ll be racing on some of the same tracks and with a lot of the same drivers and teams,” Cornett-Ching said. “Combine that with the added value that the NASCAR brand can bring to me and my partners (and) it was really a no-brainer (to move up to the K&N league).”

Cornett-Ching will kick off her 2016 racing season in the ARCA season opener at Daytona International Speedway on Feb. 13. The following day, she’ll compete in the K&N Pro Series East season opener at nearby New Smyrna Speedway.

“The K&N Series has a great mix of tracks and is a really good place to build my skill-set and improve my confidence as a driver, but ARCA still offers valuable opportunities for big-track and radial tire experience,” Cornett-Ching said. “Seat time is seat time, no matter what I’m driving.

“So to have laps around places like Chicago, Talladega or Kansas is extremely valuable, especially when I have an opportunity to move up to Xfinity or the Truck Series in the future.”

Cornett-Ching had five top-10 finishes in 20 ARCA starts in 2015. Now that she moves up to the K&N series, she looks forward to following in the footsteps of others who preceded her.

“So many drivers came through those cars on the way to K&N success, and ultimately the top three tiers of NASCAR – Kyle Busch, Chase Elliott, Erik Jones and so many more,” she said. “There’s a pattern there.”

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