Elliott Sadler

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Reliving some of NASCAR’s most dramatic finishes

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The Minnesota Vikings’ win against the New Orleans Saints on Sunday marked the first time in NFL history that a playoff game ended with a game-winning touchdown with no time left on the clock.

NASCAR has had its share of dramatic finishes through the years. While it’s easy to debate which dramatic finishes rank among the all-time best, here’s a look at some of the most dramatic (and surprising) wins in NASCAR.

The first selection comes from what is now the Xfinity Series. It was the 2012 season-opening race at Daytona International Speedway. Kurt Busch led with Kyle Busch pushing him as they entered Turn 3. Behind them were Joey Logano, Trevor Bayne, Tony Stewart, Elliott SadlerRicky Stenhouse Jr., Kasey Kahne, Cole Whitt and Brad Keselowski.

None of them won the race. 

James Buescher, who was 11th in Turn 4 won for his only Xfinity victory in 91 career starts. 

 

Carl Edwards had won the Xfinity race the day at Atlanta but had yet to win in 16 previous Cup starts before he cranked the engine at Atlanta Motor Speedway in March 2005. Edwards came from behind to beat Jimmie Johnson at the line in among the closest finishes in NASCAR.

 

Dale Earnhardt’s incredible ride from 18th to first in the final five laps in 2000 at Talladega Superspeedway is memorable for that alone but it also was his 76th and final Cup victory. When the video clip below starts, you don’t even see Earnhardt but he’s there lurking and works his way up the field. With two laps left, announcer Jerry Punch exclaims: “The Intimidator is scraped and beaten on the right side, but he will not be denied! “Mr. Restrictor Plate knows there are two laps to go! Earnhardt drives to the high side of Bobby Labonte. Wow.”

 

As they took the white flag at Watkins Glen International in 2012, Kyle Busch led, Brad Keselowski was second and Marcos Ambrose was third.

What followed was a chaotic final lap that ended with Ambrose winning. It led broadcaster Dale Jarrett to say about the beating, banging and battling: “A year’s worth of excitement in 2.45 miles. Incredible.”

 

Ricky Craven tried to make his move by Kurt Busch with two laps to go at Darlington Raceway in 2003 but slid up and made contact with Busch and lost his momentum. That allowed Busch to dive underneath and take the lead back. Craven persisted. As they came off the final corner, Craven went underneath Busch for a door-slamming drag race to the checkered flag, nipping Busch by 0.002 seconds to win.

Of course, one can’t include such a list without one of the sport’s most famous finishes. Donnie Allison led Cale Yarborough on the last lap of the 1979 Daytona 500. Yarborough dived low on the backstretch to pass Allison, who blocked. They hit, bounced off each other and hit again before crashing in Turn 3. Richard Petty drove by several seconds later to take the lead and go on to win the event. As Petty celebrated, Allison, Yarborough and Bobby Allison, who had stopped to check on his brother, fought.

 

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With Matt Kenseth retirement, Jamie McMurray knows his time in NASCAR is limited

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Jamie McMurray knows his time is coming.

At some point in the not too distant future, the book will close on his NASCAR career.

It took the somewhat-forced retirement of Matt Kenseth, who McMurray raced against beginning in Late Models in 1994, for him to come to terms with that.

Kenseth’s career ended after 18 full-time seasons in the Cup Series, the first coming in 2000. His last start, in the 2017 finale, came at the age of 45 and with him as the oldest full-time driver on the circuit.

Paired with the retirement of Dale Earnhardt Jr., it was the latest in long line of departures from the sport in the last three years, including Jeff Gordon, Tony Stewart, Greg Biffle, Danica Patrick and the surprise retirement of Carl Edwards last January.

“With Matt this year, it probably hit home the most, just because I’m such good friends with Matt,” McMurray said last month during Champion’s Week in Las Vegas. “I know how much he loved racing. It was awesome he was able to win at Phoenix this year in his last year. It’s kind of sad, honestly. I came in not long after those guys, so your days are somewhat numbered.”

The driver of Chip Ganassi Racing’s No. 1 Chevrolet has a rough target date he has in mind for exiting the spotlight he stepped into in 2002. That year he won his second Cup start while driving for an injured Sterling Marlin.

“My goal is to be able to race for maybe four more years, maybe a little bit more,” McMurray said.

If McMurray get his wish, that would have him exiting the Cup Series by at least the end of 2021, 19 years after his first start. Having turned 41 last June, he would be 45 at the end of that season.

Of the recently retired, Biffle came into the Cup Series full-time in 2003 with McMurray. Edwards made 13 starts in 2004 before his full rookie season in 2005. Like Kenseth, Earnhardt’s rookie year came in 2000.

McMurray, who has seven Cup wins, is one of five drivers remaining in Cup who competed full-time in 2003.

Joining him are Ryan Newman, Kurt Busch, Kevin Harvick and Jimmie Johnson.

Newman and Johnson enter their 17th full-time Cup seasons.

Busch and Harvick enter their 18th full-time seasons.

Elliott Sadler also raced full-time in 2003. He will again be driving for JR Motorsports in the Xfinity Series.

Four years may seem a long way off, but it’ll be here before you know it. How does McMurray anticipate dealing with having to make the decision on when to walk away? He’ll be taking notes from the recently retired.

“I will watch them for the next few years,” McMurray said. “I watched Biffle this year with it being his first year out of the sport. You watch that transition, because there’s some unknowns there of, we are so busy. Everybody in our industry is so busy every single weekend. You hear everyone talk about how hard it is to step away because of how much time you all of a sudden have. You have time for things you didn’t used to. It’s sad in a way.”

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Social Roundup: Sights from the Xfinity, Truck Series Awards Banquet

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The NASCAR season officially came to a close Saturday night in Charlotte, North Carolina, with the annual Xfinity and Camping World Truck Series Awards at the Charlotte Convention Center. The ceremony will air at 9 p.m. ET on Dec. 17 on NBCSN.

Xfinity driver William Byron and Truck Series driver Christopher Bell were recognized as this season’s champions before they move on with their careers. Byron will race in the Cup Series for Hendrick Motorsports and Bell moves up to Xfinity with Joe Gibbs Racing.

NASCAR handed out plenty of annual awards for each series.

Rookie of the Year: Byron (Xfinity) and Chase Briscoe (Trucks)
Manufacturer title: Chevrolet (Xfinity) and Toyota (Trucks)
Comcast Community Champion: Chip Ganassi Racing pit crew department

Mobil 1 Driver of the Year: Kyle Busch (Xfinity) and Bell (Trucks)
Mahle Engine Builder of the Year: Roush Yates Racing’s Doug Yates (Xfinity) and Joe Gibbs Racing’s Mark Cronquist (Trucks).
Duralast Brake in the Race: Busch (Xfinity) and Bell (Trucks)

JR Motorsports’ Elliott Sadler was voted most popular driver for the third time after he finished runner-up in the season standings to Byron.

Brad Keselowski Racing’s Chase Briscoe was voted most popular driver in the Truck Series, though there was a slight mixup with his name on the trophy. We’ve all been there.

Here are more sights from the award ceremony brought to you by social media.

NASCAR America: Best of helmet cam

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This year brought the introduction of the helmet cam to NASCAR, which provided incredible images from the driver’s point of view in the cockpit.

NASCAR America presents the highlights the camera has provided.

They include:

  • Kurt Busch‘s hard front-end impact in a multi-car crash late in the Brickyard 400.
  • Denny Hamlin narrowly avoiding a crash late in the fall Talladega race.
  • Elliott Sadler‘s smoke-filled spin in the Xfinity Series’ fall race at Texas Motor Speedway.
  • The view from the cockpit during a visit to pit road.

Watch the above video for the full segment.

NASCAR America: Elliott Sadler shouldn’t blame Ryan Preece for losing Xfinity title

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It was arguably one of the most difficult pills Elliott Sadler has ever had to swallow.

Just when it appeared he might finally capture his first career NASCAR championship in Saturday’s Xfinity Series title race, Sadler found himself held up by Ryan Preece, who was racing for the car owner’s title for Joe Gibbs Racing but was not involved in the race for the driver championship.

Preece was running the high line and kept Sadler from getting by him. Sadler tried everything he could to pass Preece, even putting his bumper into the back of Preece’s Toyota to get him to move over.

But that contact ultimately wound up costing Sadler one last chance to catch William Byron, who went on to win the Xfinity championship in his first year in the series.

Sadler, meanwhile, finished second for the second consecutive year — and the fourth time in the last seven seasons.

On Monday’s NASCAR America, analysts Dale Jarrett and Parker Kligerman broke down what happened to Sadler and whether Preece played a part in preventing Sadler from winning the title.

Here’s how Jarrett looked at it:

“I understand the frustration from Elliott Sadler with a driver that really’s not involved in anything. Ryan Preece is an outstanding young driver that made a name for himself. … I think they gave him bad information and put this young man in a very difficult situation. He wasn’t going to catch the 22 car at that point in time. It was really time for him to get out of the way of the two drivers battling for the championship.

“Unfortunately, his name is going to be associated with affecting the championship in this way. It’s part of it, he doesn’t have to pull out of the way, it’s up to Elliott to figure out a way to get around him.”

And here’s how Kligerman analyzed things:

“I completely understand Elliott Sadler’s frustrations. He had a chance to win the championship, he was in the front and felt like not being able to accomplish that pass on Ryan Preece and maybe get a little help there.

“But it’s not like Ryan stuck it out there, he was beside him and it just didn’t work out. And as they got together, I felt Ryan was running the same line he had been running, and that was Elliott trying to make a last-ditch effort.

“… He’s racing to have a job, to have a career in this sport, like Elliott Sadler. He told me after the race he was upset because he was an Elliott Sadler fan his whole life. He grew up watching Elliott Sadler. He did not want to be part of the championship discussion but was trying to do his job, doing what Joe Gibbs Racing told him to do, which was to try to beat the 22 for the owner’s title.

“I know why Elliott is upset, it’s the fourth time he’s finished second, but I don’t think Ryan did anything wrong.”

Catch more of what Parker and DJ had to say in the video above.

And speaking of William Byron, check out what our two analysts had to say about his championship in the video below.