Carl Edwards

Getty Images

Today’s Cup race at Kansas: Start time, weather, TV/radio info

Leave a comment

It’s once again elimination time in the NASCAR Cup Series.

The playoff field will be cut from 12 to eight drivers following today’s Hollywood Casino 400 at Kansas Speedway.

Pole-sitter Martin Truex Jr. will be looking to earn his sixth win on a 1.5-mile track this year. He won the last visit to Kansas Speedway in May.

Here’s all the important info you need ahead of the race, which will air on NBCSN.

(All times are Eastern)

START: Jay Hernandez will give the command to start engines at 3:07 p.m. Green flag is scheduled for 3:16 p.m.

DISTANCE: The race is scheduled for 267 laps (400 miles) around the 1.5-mile oval.

STAGES: Stage 1 ends at Lap 80. Stage 2 ends at Lap 160.

COMPETITION CAUTION: Lap 30

PRERACE SCHEDULE: Garage opens at 9:30 a.m. Driver-crew chief meeting is at 1 p.m. Driver introductions are at 2:20 p.m.

NATIONAL ANTHEM: Angie Rosner will perform the anthem at 3:01 p.m..

TV/RADIO:  NBCSN will broadcast the race at 3 p.m. Coverage begins at 1 p.m. on NBCSN with NASCAR America, followed by Countdown to Green at 2:30 p.m. Motor Racing Network will broadcast the race on radio and at mrn.com, starting with its pre-race show at 2 p.m. SiriusXM NASCAR Radio will carry the MRN broadcast.

FORECAST: The wunderground.com site predicts a temperature of 67 degrees and no chance of rain at race time.

LAST TIME: Martin Truex Jr. led the final 19 laps to win in May. He beat Brad Keselowski and Kevin Harvick. Harvick is the defending winner of this race. He beat Carl Edwards and Joey Logano last October.

STARTING LINEUP: Click here for starting lineup

Here’s your primer heading into second half of NASCAR Cup playoffs

Getty Images
Leave a comment

If you thought the first five races of the NASCAR Cup playoffs were intense, you haven’t seen nothing yet.

As the 10-race playoffs move into their second half, the final five races will likely be more competitive than the first five.

That’s particularly true in Sunday’s cut-off race at Kansas, where the current field of 12 remaining playoff contenders will be cut to eight after the checkered flag falls.

And then there will be the Round of 8 cut-off race at Phoenix in four weeks that will set the four-driver field for the championship race in the season finale at Homestead-Miami Speedway.

Thanks to our friends at RacingInsights.com, here’s some of the top playoff insights that will help fans better understand where we are in the playoffs heading into Kansas:

  • Playoff drivers have won all five races in the 2017 playoffs.
  • The last time a driver who didn’t make it into the playoffs won a playoff race was Denny Hamlin at Homestead in 2013.
  • The last playoff race won by a playoff driver who was previously eliminated from the playoffs was Dale Earnhardt Jr. at Phoenix in 2015.
  • Tony Stewart in 2005 is the only driver to go on to win the championship without winning a race during the playoffs.
  • Four of five playoff races so far this season have been won from a qualifying position of sixth or better.
  • Brad Keselowski won at Talladega driving a Ford, ending a four-race playoff winning streak by Toyotas. Also, prior to Talladega, Toyota drivers had won all four poles and all four races in the 2017 playoffs. Dale Earnhardt Jr. took the pole at Talladega, but finished seventh.
  • Brad Keselowski won at Talladega with a last lap pass for the win, it was the eighth playoff race won with a last lap pass and the only one in the last 29 races.
  • There were 11 cautions at Talladega, the most cautions in the last 18 playoff races.
  • There were a combined 21 cautions in the last two playoff races, the same number as the previous four playoff races combined.
  • Talladega last week: 14 cars running at the finish, 26 total DNFs (including 24 DNFs due to wrecks), three red flags and only two playoff drivers finished in the top 10 – all records for a playoff race.
  • A Chevrolet driver has finished runner-up in each of this season’s first five playoff races.
  • Chase Elliott has finished runner-up three times so far in the playoffs. The record for most runner-up finishes in the playoffs in a season was four by Jeff Gordon in 2014 and Jimmie Johnson in 2006. Elliott has also finished runner-up at both 1.5-mile tracks so far, with three more 1.5-mile tracks still left in the final five races (Kansas, Texas and Homestead-Miami).
  • Kevin Harvick, Denny Hamlin and Kyle Busch are the only drivers still playoff-eligible that have scored stage points in every playoff race.
  • The best average finish by a driver in all 10 races of the playoffs is 4.9 by Carl Edwards in 2011. Edwards tied Tony Stewart for the championship, but Stewart won on the first tiebreaker – more wins (five to Edwards’ one).
  • Martin Truex Jr. has led the playoff standings through the first five races of the playoffs, tying Matt Kenseth in 2013 for the most races led by a driver to start the playoffs. Truex also won at Kansas in May.
  • Three drivers have won races during the playoffs in all three years of the elimination format entering 2017: Kevin Harvick, Joey Logano and Jimmie Johnson all three drivers have yet to win in 2017.
  • Only two of the 135 playoff races were won by drivers getting their first NASCAR Cup win: Clint Bowyer in 2007 at New Hampshire and Brian Vickers in 2006 at Talladega.
  • Jimmie Johnson is the only driver to win a race in every season of the playoffs entering 2017. Entering Kansas, Johnson remains winless in the 2017 playoffs.

Carl Edwards to receive Stan Musial Award for sportsmanship

Getty Images
1 Comment

Former NASCAR Cup driver Carl Edwards is among one of more than a dozen individuals that will receive the prestigious 2017 Musial Award.

The annual ceremony will be held Nov. 18 at the Peabody Opera House in St. Louis.

The Musial Awards – named after late St. Louis Cardinals Hall of Famer Stan Musial – “honor this year’s greatest moments of sportsmanship and the biggest names in sports for their class and character,” according to a media release.

Edwards will be honored for his actions in last year’s season finale at Homestead-Miami Speedway. Here’s how the awards committee described what Edwards did that day:

Last November at Homestead—Miami Speedway, Edwards was among four drivers in contention for NASCAR’s Cup Series championship. He led the season finale race with 10 laps to go. But as he tried to block competitor Joey Logano from passing him on a restart, the two drivers crashed, ending Edwards’ shot for his first Cup Series title.

“Instead of losing his cool, as other athletes might have done, Edwards took the high road and showed pure class. He walked over to Logano’s pit crew, shook hands with crew chief Todd Gordon, and wished the team good luck. It was a gesture of extraordinary sportsmanship that was lauded throughout NASCAR.

“Based on the character he has shown throughout his career, it was not a surprise Edwards would take such a gracious approach. Winner of NASCAR’s Busch Series in 2011 and holder of 28 Cup Series wins, the Columbia, Mo., native’s success on the track is equaled by the class, respect and humility he has personified over time.”

Also, renowned track star Jackie Joyner-Kersee – considered by some as the greatest female athlete ever – will receive the Musial Lifetime Achievement Award, joining previous lifetime award winners Joe Torre (2014), Arnold Palmer (2015) and Cal Ripken Jr. (2016).

Other honorees include Arizona Cardinals (NFL) president Michael Bidwell, female boxer Aliyah Charbonier and LSU head baseball coach Paul Mainieri.

Talladega as the regular-season finale? It’s been suggested by drivers

Brian Lawdermilk/Getty Images
1 Comment

CHARLOTTE – Talladega Superspeedway’s move from cutoff to middle race of the Round of 12 has been well-received, but Cup drivers have been lobbying for another move with the race.

Denny Hamlin, who founded the Drivers Council that regularly meets with NASCAR, said “it’s been floated” to move the 2.66-mile oval to the regular-season finale.

“I think it should be the last race before the playoffs,” Hamlin told NBC Sports and NASCAR.com Tuesday at the NASCAR Hall of Fame, where he unveiled a Martinsville Speedway paint scheme on his No. 11 Toyota that highlights a new partnership between FedEx and Walgreens. “That is the ultimate wild-card spot. If you want to see the craziest Talladega race ever, it would be right before the playoffs started. Probably 28 cars or so with their last opportunity to make it in the playoffs. To me, it’s a no-brainer where it should be in the schedule, but getting the tracks to agree is going to be very hard.

“It would be the ultimate cutoff race. Not knowing whether you’re in or not until the last lap, that would be the ultimate race. (Talladega) should want it. Even over being in the playoffs itself, (the regular-season finale) is a bigger event. I’m all for changing schedules around, but you really should put the racetracks where I think they’d thrive, and I think a cutoff Talladega race would be amazing.”

Any move wouldn’t happen until at least 2019. NASCAR already has announced the 2018 schedule with Indianapolis Motor Speedway as the regular-season finale (replacing Richmond International Raceway, which played host to the race from 2004-2017).

With another added layer of playoff points, Sunday’s race already is shaping up differently than 2016 when the Joe Gibbs Racing cars of Kyle Busch, Matt Kenseth and Carl Edwards protected their points leads by intentionally running at the rear.

That left Hamlin, who needed a win to advance, trying to run for the lead with no help from his teammates.

“It really hurt me because I was on an island trying to race up front with no teammates where all the other teammates were working together and all mine were in the back,” said Hamlin, who finished third and was eliminated in the Round of 12 for the second consecutive season. “I understood where they were and said I’d be doing the same thing (in their position), but it certainly hurt our efforts to get a good finish.”

Hamlin said having Talladega as the second race in the Round of 12 is “better. No doubt about it. Talladega in the playoffs is sketchy anyway, but to have it as a cutoff race like it was last year is a little over the top.”

The Joe Gibbs Racing driver, who is ranked fifth in the points and 13 points above the cutoff, is expecting Sunday to resemble most Talladega races of recent memory, though stage points will discourage laying back.

“I don’t think it’ll get crazy until the last half of the race,” he said. “I think everyone is going to race up front. It’s going to do all the things they wanted it to do, competition-wise. There’s no laying back, there’s no, ‘Let’s ride this day out.’ Obviously it’s going to make for exciting ends of stages in my opinion. That’s where you have to be aware of the wrecks that can happen.

“I don’t think it’ll be as aggressive because people still want to stick around and need to be around at the end.”

NASCAR Chairman Brian France discusses penalties, costs & manufacturers

Photo by Thos Robinson/Getty Images for The Buoniconti Fund to Cure Paralysis
7 Comments

NASCAR Chairman Brian France called into SiriusXM NASCAR Radio’s “Tradin’ Paint” show Wednesday and discussed various topics with co-hosts Jim Noble and Chocolate Myers.

France offered his thoughts to the family of Hall of Fame inductee Robert Yates, who died Monday at age 74. France remembered Yates as “one of the pioneers” of the sport.

France was asked a variety of questions. Here are some of his responses:

Q: What is taking up your attention?

Brian France: “It’s always aligning everybody’s interest. It’s really that simple but hard to do. Things are different than they were five years ago, 10 years ago. I think aligning the interests, getting the costs out of the system … So the team owners can compete with less resources than they otherwise would need to and still do it at a high level. It’s all about that. It’s very hard to do because every stakeholder has their own interest and there’s institutional things that go on that either you can’t change or are hard to change. In the end, my dad used to say what makes it successful, he would always say that everybody has to win. The bigger we get, the more complicated it is, the harder it is to deliver. That’s where our goal is all the time.’’

Q: How do you see the sport’s future with all the young drivers?

France: “That’s the exciting part. The other part is we are in a transition. That happens if you go through our history. Sometimes it happens the way it is now, where a number of the top drivers exit for one reason or another. You didn’t mention Carl Edwards, who left for different reasons. That happens. Usually it’s more of not so many at one time but every once in a while we’ll have these moments. Everybody steps away at their choosing. The good news for us, you’re exactly right, there’s a lot of talent here that is coming through the system that are really going to be competitive and show their thing and that’s the beauty of sports. You can get a different group to put some … fingerprints on success and being a part of NASCAR. We’re looking forward to it.’’

Q: There often has been a lot of talk after races about penalties. How do we keep that from dominating things in the future?

France: “Boy, do I dislike two things. One is having to deal with penalties or infractions even though we have to. We have to keep the playing field even, and we have to do what we have to do. The second part that I would prefer to not have to talk about is the business side of NASCAR. That’s important, too.

“Because all of it takes away from what happened on Sunday or Saturday or Friday night in any of our national series. I look at it this way, I never get worked up over anything because I know the teams are pushing right to that last inch and then every once in a while they flop over the line, and there’s very rarely where it’s somebody just egregiously trying to get an advantage. It’s true that we have to have restrictions and tight rules and so on and it’s also true that the teams are so close to that line they’re going to create a P1 or P2, whatever it’s going to be, I don’t get worked over that because that’s auto racing.

“If we weren’t having some of that, then they’re not competing hard, they’re not trying to out-think, out-engineer, out-do some other teams. I don’t get so worked up over that. Frankly, I’d rather not talk about it. I’d rather we do what we do, which is we issue the penalty and we phrase it in a way … whatever the penalty is and our results on that and just not make it a big deal, but I realize it is easy to get caught up in it.’’

Q: One report that NASCAR is helping find sponsorship for Danica Patrick and Darrell Wallace Jr. for next year and how important is it that both are on the track next year?

France: “We get involved all the time with sponsorship arrangements with individual teams. That’s not inconsistent with what we do. As far as those two drivers, of course we would like to see both of them have a real good opportunity. We can’t control all of that. At the end of the day, you’ve got to compete, and both of those drivers have shown that they can compete at some level. The question is, is it high enough to attract the right sponsorship and interest? We’ll have to see how that plays out.’’

Q: What about new manufacturers?

France: “There’s two that have shown a lot of interest and are examining just how you go about it. It’s hard to do. It’s hard to come in and get the right teams. They all want to come in and compete at a very high level as fast as they can, which makes the challenge even harder. There are two and we’ll see how it plays out. Our preference would be to be able to add one more. Interestingly, the other car manufactures are open to that, too. They’d like to compete themselves with one another and take a lot of pride in that. My hope is that as soon as it can work out, we’ll add a fourth. We’ll have to see how that goes.’’

Q: What would you say to fans who are concerned about the financial future of the sport and the costs associated with racing?

France: “I would say look at history. There’s always cycles. Sometimes we have too many teams. I remember not that long ago, that Richard Petty, when he was racing couldn’t make the event for example. That happened. We’re working on it all the time. That stuff works itself out.

“Every sport has different cycles where it’s better than it was or less than it should be, whatever it is, that will work out. Our job is that if there is a way for us from a policy standpoint, as an example, getting the cost out of the system, that we are going to work, that’s where the charter agreements that we did a couple of years ago allow us to, get at those things.

“I wouldn’t worry about that for one minute if I were a fan because it just works itself out. We will make good decisions and the teams are working very closely with us to take any shortcomings out of the system and figure it out. I wouldn’t worry about that for a minute if I were a fan. I am a fan.’’

 and on Facebook