Jimmie Johnson says annual slump is irksome but not worrisome

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DARLINGTON, S.C. – Summer slumps have become such a dominant narrative for Jimmie Johnson, the downturn in results doesn’t mean a downbeat attitude for the seven-time series champion.

So despite two top 10s in 11 starts (both 10ths, at Michigan and New Hampshire) since his June 4 victory at Dover International Speedway, Johnson is confident the No. 48 Chevrolet will kick into gear when the playoffs begin in two weeks at Chicagoland Speedway.

But it doesn’t make him any less befuddled about why the No. 48 Chevrolet always seems to run coldest when the weather is hottest.

“I wish I knew why summers were so hard on us,” the Hendrick Motorsports driver said Friday before practice at Darlington Raceway, where he has three wins but finishes of 19th and 33rd in the past two Southern 500s. “Believe me, we sit down every winter and look at the summer stretch and think, ‘How can we turn it around? How can we avoid that summer slump?’ But most years, damn it, it shows up, and it is so frustrating.

“So I think it just shows how hard it is to stay on top. I think all teams have lulls in the season, and we’ve been able to typically start well and end well, and that’s served us really good over the years.”

Last year, Johnson’s tailspin was slightly less acute. He had three top 10s (with a best of third at Indianapolis) over the summer but then led a race-high 118 of 270 laps in the playoff opener at Chicagoland Speedway, kicking off a march to a seventh championship with three wins in the final seven races.

En route to his sixth championship in 2013, Johnson finished outside the top 25 in four consecutive races entering the playoffs and then notched top fives in seven of the final 10 races (with only one finish outside the top 10, a 13th at Talladega Superspeedway)

“There’s probably seven or eight years that feel a lot like (2017),” said Johnson, who currently would start the playoffs with 16 points after wins at Texas, Bristol and Dover and a stage win at Sonoma. “It’s not just last year. We have some decent races in the summer, but more bad ones than good ones.”

At least two could have been very good this season: Johnson was racing for the lead with a lap remaining at the Brickyard when he crashed as his engine began leaking oil. Two weeks ago at Bristol Motor Speedway, he smacked the wall late in the race and ruined a shot at the top five.

“There are some moments that could have changed the conversation already that haven’t,” he said. “But I know those final 10 races, at least nine of them are amazing tracks for me. We always bank on that.

With his title-clinching win at Homestead-Miami Speedway last season, Johnson has won at all but Chicagoland Speedway among the final 10 tracks, which include his four winningest ovals on the circuit.

Of his 83 career wins, Johnson has a combined 35 wins at Dover (11), Martinsville (nine), Charlotte (eight) and Texas (seven). His worst playoff track is Talladega Superspeedway, where he has an average finish of 17th.


NASCAR America: Importance of keeping NASCAR connected to grassroots racing

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The importance of grassroots racing to the future of NASCAR is a constant subject these days thanks to the likes of Kevin Harvick and Kyle Larson.

Now NASCAR America’s Dale Earnhardt Jr., Steve Letarte and Jeff Burton get their chance to sound off on the subject.

On Tuesday’s episode, the panel of analysts discussed why keeping NASCAR connected to the short tracks and lower series across the country is vital to the sport’s future.

“We don’t have that national series running old short tracks that draws people to the race track but also draws them to the TV on Saturday and Sunday,” Burton said.

Earnhardt brought up an attempt by Bristol Motor Speedway to purchase the Fairgrounds Speedway in Nashville, Tennessee, last year.  The attempted failed.

“My heart was broken because I thought we had a real opportunity to bring one of the touring series, either the Truck or Xfinity, back to Fairgrounds,” Earnhardt said. “That’s where I think we’re broken or disconnected. The late model guys and the guys that are running on these local tracks don’t have the connection to the Truck Series or Xfinity Series. They need to take those series, Truck or Xfinity, back to the short tracks and bridge that link.”

The three analysts went on to discuss the short tracks and races that were part of their formative racing years.

Watch the above video for more.

NASCAR America: Scan All from Auto Club Speedway

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Martin Truex Jr. was once again in championship form Sunday at Auto Club Speedway.

That fact frustrated some drivers, especially Kyle Busch.

You can hear his frustrations and more in this week’s Scan All.

Here are some highlights.

— “I mean, he’s a (expletive) idiot for racing that hard 30 laps into a (expletive) race.” – Chad Johnston, crew chief for Kyle Larson after contact with Kevin Harvick wrecked Harvick on Lap 39.

Johnston’s tone cooled once Harvick owned up to his mistake.

“Harvick’s taking responsibility for that, so don’t sweat it,” Johnston said.

— “You did a hell of a job keeping it off that inside wall. I was watching on the roof cam and was like, ‘Oh Lord, don’t hit that one.” – Rodney Childers, crew chief of Harvick.

— “I don’t know what the (expletive) he’s got going on, but damn I don’t have that.” – Kyle Busch observing how much better Martin Truex Jr.’s car was performing

— “This thing went from absolutely horrible to even worse than that.” – Ricky Stenhouse Jr.

— “I don’t even know what the hell we’re doing, what the hell’s going on and what we’re going to do next. It’s been the same all day. We haven’t made any ground on it.” – Kyle Busch as he struggled to keep pace with Larson and Truex.

Watch the above video for more.

NASCAR America: Biggest storylines through five race weekends

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After five races in the Cup season, NASCAR America’s analysts assessed what the biggest storylines are ahead of this weekend’s race at Martinsville Speedway.

Dale Earnhardt Jr., Steve Letarte and Jeff Burton took turns sharing what’s stood out to them.

Jeff Burton started off by saying Kevin Harvick‘s success was the “easy answer.”

Burton discussed his surprise at Chevrolet teams underperforming.

“It reminds you in racing that you don’t really know what’s going to happen until it happens,” Burton said. “I’m surprised we haven’t seen more performance from the new Chevy body.”

Earnhardt was surprised at how big Martin Truex Jr’s margin of victory was on Sunday. He beat Kyle Busch by 11.6 seconds.

“I felt like in the first couple of races, maybe we got tricked into thinking the new inspections process had maybe leveled the playing field a little bit, even though Harvick won three in a row,” Earnhardt said. “Then Truex goes out and does what he did last year, maybe even better than he did last year.”

Letarte said his “big shock” for 2018 has been the “lack of change.”

“It’s the same players leading laps that we saw in 2017,” Letarte said. “Everyone is trying to catch up. I’ve always found it the hardest to continue to push your guys, continue to push your race cars when you’re already winning. It’s easy when you’re getting beat to motivate everybody.”

Earnhardt also observed how younger drivers have struggled to shine through five races.

“Across the board, the young guys still aren’t measuring up to the veterans yet,” Earnhardt said.

Watch the above video for more.

Daniel Hemric to make Cup debut at Richmond Raceway in April

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Xfinity Series driver Daniel Hemric will make his Cup debut next month at Richmond Raceway, Richard Childress Racing announced Tuesday on Fox Sports 1’s “NASCAR Race Hub.”

Hemric, 27, will drive the No. 8 Chevrolet for RCR at Richmond on April 21. He will also compete in the Sept. 30 race on the Charlotte Motor Speedway road course.

A native of Kannapolis, North Carolina, Hemric will be sponsored by Smokey Mountain Herbal Snuff in both races. The company serves as an associate sponsor on Hemric’s No. 21 car in the Xfinity Series.

“You only get one chance to make your Cup Series debut, and it is pretty incredible to know that I am able to do it with Richard Childress Racing and with a partner such as Smokey Mountain Herbal Snuff,” Hemric said in a press release. “RCR and Smokey Mountain Herbal Snuff have been so influential in so many drivers’ careers – a lot of my heroes growing up. To know they will play a large role in the next step of my career and my initial Cup Series debut is very special.”

MORE: Daniel Hemric’s racing career saved by a Ford Mustang

“Since joining our organization, Daniel Hemric has shown his determination and dedication to this sport both on and off the track,” said Richard Childress in a press release. “Making his Cup Series debut is the next step in his career and we are proud to have him take that step with RCR.”

Hemric is in his second full-time season with RCR in the Xfinity Series. Last season he was part of the championship four at Homestead-Miami Speedway. Through five races this season, Hemric is fifth in the standings.

“To make my debut at Richmond will make me feel at home, since I spent years coming up through the ranks at short tracks across the country,” Hemric said. “To do it again in front of my hometown crowd in Charlotte later in the year is an overwhelming feeling. Many people have laid everything on the line to get me to this point and I am extremely grateful to all of those people for putting me in position to get this shot in the Cup Series. These are going to be two very special weekends, to say the least.”

The Richmond race weekend won’t be Hemric’s first time in a Cup car. He was called on by RCR last year to drive Ryan Newman’s car in a Goodyear tire test on the CMS road course. He also practiced and qualified Paul Menard‘s car last November at Texas Motor Speedway.

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