Logano spins Kenseth with 7 laps left, goes on to win at Kansas

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Joey Logano pushed Matt Kenseth out of the way with seven laps remaining and then sailed on to his second consecutive win in Sunday’s Hollywood Casino 400 at Kansas Speedway.

Logano, who already is qualified for Round 3 of the Chase after last week’s race at Charlotte, clipped the left rear of Kenseth’s car after the latter attempted to block Logano.

Kenseth told NBC: “I pulled up in front of him and he just lifted my tires off the ground and wrecked me. I won’t talk to Joey. I don’t have anything to talk to him about really. … I’ve always raced him with a ton of respect and have been one of his biggest fans. I’m certainly not anymore.”

Logano defended his actions: “I felt like I got pinched twice on the straightaways. He raced me hard and I raced him hard back. If I get raced like that, I’ll race the same way.”

Kenseth led the most laps (153) and finished 14th.

MORE: Race results

MORE: Points standings

The scheduled 267-lap race was extended to 269 laps due to a green-white-checker finish brought about by the caution for Kenseth’s spin.

It was Logano’s 13th career Sprint Cup win and his second consecutive fall Chase victory at Kansas.

Denny Hamlin finished second, followed by Jimmie Johnson, Kasey Kahne and Kyle Busch.

 

HOW LOGANO WON: Kenseth blocked Logano and the latter wasn’t going to let it happen again. The contact caused Kenseth to spin and put Logano into the lead.

WHO ELSE HAD A GOOD DAY: Despite what happened to Kenseth, Joe Gibbs Racing had yet another strong run with its other three drivers in the top eight: Denny Hamlin (second), Kyle Buch (fifth) and Carl Edwards (eighth). … Hendrick Motorsports also had a strong day – with the exception of Dale Earnhardt Jr., who finished 21st. Jimmie Johnson, who was eliminated from the Chase after the first round, finished third. New father Kasey Kahne was fourth, and Jeff Gordon finished 10th. … Ryan Blaney finished seventh.

WHO HAD A BAD DAY: Clint Bowyer wrecked his Toyota on Lap 170. Bowyer finished 40th. … Dale Earnhardt Jr. finds himself in a must-win situation next Sunday at Talladega after finishing 21st. … Tony Stewart and Kyle Larson both spun in the first half of the race. Stewart finished 35th, six laps down, while Larson was 29th, four laps down. … Austin Dillon was running as high as fifth when he lost a right front tire on Lap 155, just past the halfway mark. Dillon suffered significant damage to the right side of his car after it hit the wall, leading to a 41st-place finish.

NOTABLE: AJ Allmendinger and Trevor Bayne had a scrum on Lap 108. Allmendinger told his team on the radio that Bayne forced him into the wall, so Allmendinger retaliated with a number of bumps into the rear end of Bayne’s car. … Kevin Harvick lost his bid to win when the gas can fell out of his pit stall after Harvick pulled away, leading to a stop-and-go penalty that caused him to lose at least one lap. When he came to serve his penalty, the shifter handle in his car broke, forcing him to shift manually for the remainder of the race. Harvick finished 16th. … Martin Truex Jr. is eighth in the standings, just six points ahead of Kyle Busch, who is one of four drivers below the Chase cut-off line heading to Talladega.

QUOTE OF THE DAY: “I got some air, it bit and turned me. I probably should have just spun to the inside, but I thought I could save it. Guess what? I did not save it. It was a hard hit. It was a wake-up call.” – Clint Bowyer after his crash.

WHAT’S NEXT: The most unpredictable race of the Chase is on tap next Sunday at Talladega Superspeedway in the CampingWorld.com 500. This is the final race of Round 2 of the Chase; the four lowest-ranked drivers afterward will be eliminated from further advancement in the Chase.

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NASCAR America: Martin Truex Jr., Daniel Suarez, Erik Jones get a feel of how Olympians train (video)

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NASCAR drivers talk almost continuously about how they have to be in top physical condition to endure sometimes often very difficult conditions while on a racetrack and behind the wheel.

One only needs to look at seven-time NASCAR Cup champion Jimmie Johnson to see the rewards of being fit.

But going to one of the Olympic training centers in the U.S. is a whole other thing, something that separates folks who think they’re fit from those that really are.

Ask Toyota drivers like Martin Truex Jr., Daniel Suarez and Erik Jones, who recently participated in a two-day training session at an Olympic training facility.

We wouldn’t be surprised if they’re still nursing sore muscles, given the workouts they endured – and which gave them new appreciation for what many Olympians must go through to be the best.

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NASCAR America: Clint Bowyer, Kurt Busch ready for Daytona fireworks (video)

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NASCAR’s summer classic, the Coke Zero 400, celebrates this country’s independence, its military heroes and concludes with a great fireworks show.

But as Clint Bowyer and this year’s Daytona 500 winner, Kurt Busch, will vouch for, there’s also a lot of fireworks during the race, as the 2.5-mile, high-banked tri-oval can be one of the most difficult and intimidating places to race upon.

If a driver isn’t dodging fellow drivers, he or she is trying to stay in the draft to gain forward movement and momentum. Unfortunately, a lot of times when dodging and draft collide, so too do a lot of cars and drivers, as well.

It may not be the Daytona 500, but winning at Daytona in July is still a big prize that everyone wants to win. And don’t forget, because it’s Daytona, it’s also a place to be careful at because of the danger that can pop up at any moment.

Find out why by clicking on the above video.

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NASCAR America: Steve Letarte kicks off weekly feature honoring pit crews (video)

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They’re the unsung heroes of NASCAR, the guys who typically don’t get enough praise when things go right, and then oftentimes have the finger of blame pointed at them when things go wrong.

We’re talking about one of the most important jobs in NASCAR: pit crew member.

Starting with Wednesday’s edition of NASCAR America, a guy who knows a lot about pit crews – former crew chief turned NBC NASCAR analyst Steve Letarte – kicked off a feature that will run each week for the 20 remaining weeks of the season.

Letarte’s series will spotlight the importance of pit crews, and he’ll also choose pit crew all-stars to recognize their contributions to the sport and their perseverance on pit road.

This week’s first bunch of pit crew all-stars are Caleb Hurd, gasman for Denny Hamlin; Jeff Zarella, tire specialist for Kurt Busch and Frank Mathalia, engine tuner for Austin Dillon.

Give them and their peers some love and check out the above video.

NASCAR America: Dale Earnhardt Jr. wants one final Daytona win for himself and his father (video)

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Daytona International Speedway has been a bittersweet place for Dale Earnhardt Jr.

It’s been the place of his biggest NASCAR Cup career wins, including the Daytona 500 in 2004 and 2014.

But it’s also the same place where he lost his father  in a last-lap wreck in the 2001 Daytona 500.

Now, Earnhardt returns to the “World Center of Speed” for what will be the final time in his 18-year NASCAR Cup career.

On Wednesday’s edition of NASCAR America, Earnhardt reflected upon all the good and bad Daytona has meant to him and his family.

On his first time back to Daytona after his father’s death nearly five months earlier: “Once we got to Daytona, we drove by the racetrack, pulled in, parked in Turn 3, got out and walked around. The track was empty, quiet and I’d never been to the crash site. That’s where dad, in my mind, lost his life. That was where we all remember him last.”

Returning to Daytona for the first time after his father’s death there: “I felt like that was a place I wanted to visit. And every time I go to Daytona, even today, I go around that racetrack, I look at that spot, I look at that knoll of grass before the exit of Turn 4. I wanted to go there and see how I felt and see what kind of emotions happened so that I could get whatever was going to be out of the way.

“I told myself what I was going through is the same sadness that some guy somewhere in the Midwest is dealing with right now. Who am I to go on and on about how hard it was, because somebody, somewhere right now is dealing with a loss.”

How he wishes his father was still here to see the man and driver he’s become: “I’d have loved it if he’d stuck around a lot longer, but that’s not the way it was supposed to be. And we figured out how to make it (when he won the 2001 Coke Zero 400 in his father’s honor).”

On wanting to win one last time at Daytona in a Cup car this Saturday night: “I’d love to win at Daytona and add another win to the Earnhardt column. Every time I win there, I think it’s another win for me and dad because his success there stretches far beyond the Daytona 400 and July 400. But any time I win there, that’s one more stake in the ground that we claim this track as a place we dominate.”

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